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WALTHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 4867 



00650 2407 




Wal. Ref. 

EDUCATION 

1936 




COMPLIMENTS OF 

Embassy Theatre 

Wm. Hartnett, Mgr. 
Matinees at 2 o'clock 
Evenings at 8 o'clock 



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Compliments of 

JEAN'S LUNCH 

220 MOODY STREET 

Thomas M. Nolan Jr., Prop. 



C>4, C2>(. -=Z»l. O'O'AW'l II 



^OfifrO^O'**!^ 












Gray's Furniture Co., Inc. 



621 MOODY STREET 



Harry Kniznik, Class of 1919 



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C. F. CASHMAN 

Iver Johnson & Columbia Bicycles 

Umbrellas Repaired Bicycles Repaired 

Keys Made Violins Repaired 

Lawn Mowers Sharpened 

Tennis Rackets Restrung 

Vacuum Cleaners Repaired 

Carriage & Sick Chair, Cart & Tricycle Tires 
Put On 

Radios Repaired & Batteries Charged 



i 
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| 462 Moody Street 

! 
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Waltham, Mass. 



Compliments Of 

Two Brothers Tailors 

589 MAIN STREET 

S. G. Nersesian, Prop. 

ESTABLISHED 1898 



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Compliments Of 

GEORGE E. OLSON 

Men's Shop 



377 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



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DO YOU KNOW THAT YOU \ 

I SAVE MONEY WHEN YOU \ 

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I PURCHASE YOUR CLOTHES 

I 

| FROM US 1 

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I Collins & Rooney | 

j 267 MOODY STREET j " { 

j WALTHAM, MASS. j 

j (over Liggetts) \ j 

I i i 



THE FAY SCHOOL 

of Boston 

A Secretarial School for 
Young Women 

One-and Two-year Courses 

Summer Course 

Special Course for 

College Women 

HELEN KONTRIM, Registrar 
52 Beacon Street 



SEND FOR PIN or TROPHY CATALOG 




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In the Long Run- 



i 
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you and your friends will I 

prize the portrait that looks I 

' i 

| like you — your truest self, j 

free from stage effects and j 

little conceits. 1 



It is in this "long run" pho- 



Official photographer, Waltham High School 
Class of 1936 



i 



( tography that PURDY sue- \ 

cess has been won. ' 

| i 

J Portraiture by the camera j 

that one cannot laugh at or , 



| cry oyer in later years. { 

For the present pleasure and 

future pride protect your 
j photographic self by haying 

I PURDY make the portraits. 

i 
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I PURDY 



I 

169 TREMONT STREET BOSTON ( 






®fje Mvvov 

1936 



Waltham High School 

Class Poem 

Arthur N. Burke, Principal 

Arthur Newell Burke 

Class Statistics 

Class History 

Last Will and Testament 

Class Motto 

Who's Who 

Class Prophecy 



Jean Harrington 

Frank James Gaziano 

Robert Power 

Shirley Norman 

Edward McCabe 

Woodrow Cataldo 



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j NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



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DAY DIVISION 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS j 

| Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for I 

the understanding of modern culture, social relations, and technical j 
achievement. The purpose of this program is to give the student a liberal 

and cultural education and a vocational competence which fits him to enter . 

| some specific type of useful employment. 



I 



I Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the . 

j principles of business with specialization in ACCOUNTING, BANKING ' 

j AND FINANCE, or BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. Instruction is through j 

I lectures, solution of business problems, class discussions, motion pictures | 

and talks by business men. j 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING | 

Provides complete college programs in Engineering with professional I 

courses in the fields of CIVIL, MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL, CHEMI- j 

I CAL, INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING, and ENGINEERING ADMINIS- \ 

I TRATION. Students select, at the beginning of the Sophomore year, = 

I the course in which they intend to specialize. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Co-operative Plan provides for a combination of practical in- ' 

dustrial experience with classroom instruction. The student earns a por- I 

I tion of his school expenses and forms business contacts which prove val- { 

| uable in later years. j 

I Degrees Awarded | 

I Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Science j 

i — i 

i * 

EVENING DIVISION I 



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(For Men and Women) 

Providing complete courses of university grade in business and law, for 

high school graduates who find it necessary to work during the 

day but wish to study for further advancement. j 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS SCHOOL OF LAW j 



Programs in accounting, business ad- Four-year course. Confers the LL B. j 

ministration, and combined law and degree Graduates of this school ehg.- 



, , • . ,_„ „„,.,„ii„ „„ ble for the Massachusetts Bar Exam- I 

business, under instructors actually en- . I 

gaged in the business that they teach. l " a l0 " . .... i 

Case method of instruction similar to | 

,,_,,, ■ ,j that used in best day law schools. i 

73% of graduates hold executive posi- A0 .,ri.-u*jjj..j I 

I tions in business. Preparation for the A S £ h ° o1 ° f h 'S h standards adapted 



I tions in business, rreparation ior tne -- , v ? . , — * j . 

„ -r, . .. c u i *o to the needs of employed men and I 

i C. P. A. examinations. School grants . , /■ 1 I 

„ „ . , T .. .. , ° women. Alumni outstandingly success- J 

! B. B. A. degree. Individual courses ful as lawyers> judges, business execu- i 

available to special students. tives. 

Graduates of Waltham High School may be admitted without 
| examinations if grades are satisfactory to the Department of Admissions. 

Catalogs or further information sent upon request j 

! NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY \ 

! BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



.4 



A » (>«^ <>-*■»>( )«»()'4Hk'0<^0 



THE MIRROR, 1936 



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I Vol. XXVII Waltham, Mass., Graduation Number, 1936 

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No. 3 



'= to fjolb, ag ttoere tfte mirror up to nature' 

Hamlet, Act. Ill, Sc. ii 

Editorial Staff 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
John Eaton 

ASS'T. EDITORS-IN-CHIEF 
Wilson Slaunwhite, Jr. 
Arthur Power 



ADVERTISING MANAGER 
Blanche McKenney 

ASS'T. ADVERTISING MANAGERS 
Mae Viscogliosi 
Raymond Adams 
Robert A. Nottenburg 

MUSIC EDITOR 
George Harris 

ALUMNI EDITOR 

June Tingloff 



Effie Schofield (Girls) 

JOKE EDITOR 
Edward McCabe 



SPORT EDITORS 



STAFF SECRETARY 
Marion Davis 



BUSINESS MANAGER 
Robert Cutting 

ASS'T BUSINESS MANAGERS 
Fredrick Isakson 
Edmund Harris 
Arthur Clark 

EXCHANGE EDITOR 
Dorothy Barrett 

ASS'T. EXCHANGE EDITOR 
Helen Fiske 



ART EDITOR 
Oscar Nichols 

ASS'T. ART EDITORS 
Domenic Lupo 
Cynthia Kellog 

Peter Salvucci (Boys) 

ASS'T. JOKE EDITORS 
George MacDonald 
Barbara Glass 



LITERARY COMMITTEE 



Carmen Algeri 
Winifred Battey 
Elizabeth Castner 
Margaret Castner 
Woodrow Cataldo 
Charlotte Cody 
Betty Connelly 
Dorothy Cox 
Kathleen Eaton 



Miriam Gibbs 
Lucille Hanna 
Lucille Healey 
Elsbeth Heinish 
Ethel Johnson 
Esther Mehring 
Shirley Millar 
Ruthie Moore 
Shirley Norman 



Robert Power 
Barbara Pride 
Gladys Robinson 
Edward Stearns 
Betty Stevens 
Anne Thomas 
Esther Trachtenburg 
Virginia Wanberg 



Literary Department 
Business Department 
Art Department 



FACULTY ADVISERS 



Miss Ober, Mr. Hood 
Miss Callanan 
Miss Burgess 



>-C. 'Z>il-«!3>i)«aMH 



»O^M-U^H»-(>^^-(>^»-O^M-0-€ 






Insure in Sure Insurance ' 

I I 

I . For Action See j 

i i 

j WOODWARD & TYLER j 

844 MAIN STREET WALTHAM, MASS. ! 

( I 

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TUXEDOS FOR HIRE 
Quality Always 




Read & White 

111 SUMMER ST., BOSTON 
Woolworth Bldg., Providence 



Compliments of 

A Friend 






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WALTHAM COAL CO. 



Established 1872 



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The Waltham Senior High School 

Class Poem 
NEW PATHS 

Jean Harrington 

We start, today, to follow pathways new, 
And where they lead we may not prophesy ; 

Some go along the plains and by the sea; 
Some scale the cliffs, to heights that terrify; 

Some run amid the busy, crowded streets; 
And others lead where quiet valleys lie. 

This path is rough and rocky: that one smooth; 

This one is winding, narrow; yet another, steep; 
On one, one travels with a host of friends; 

Others are trod alone in silence deep. 
Each has a choice, a path, to call his own; 

The trail we choose to follow, we must keep. 

How shall we tread the road, when once we start ? 

Some will go bravely forward, mile by mile; 
With faltering footsteps, others mark the time; 

And some with song and laughter will the way beguile. 
There will be those who walk alone, enrapt in thought, 

While others offer helping hand and pleasant smile. 

He best will tread the pathway leading to his goal 
Who follows truly dictates of his soul. 




Arthur Newell Burke 



To <JMr. "Burke 

The greater the man, the less need be written 
of his deeds — who does not know of them? The 
greater the man, the less need be written of his 
personality — who is not familiar with it? Mr. 
Burke needs no eulogy. When at this time we 
pause to praise, no words can flow, for they would 
be entirely superfluous. Thus simply, but with 
the sincerest gratitude for all his services, we now 
dedicate this, the year's most significant issue of 
the "Mirror", to our beloved principal, Arthur 
N. Burke. 



THE IIRBOR, 1936 



ARTHUR NEWELL BURKE 



The one sad note this year amid the pleasures 
of graduation comes with the knowledge that 
Arthur Newell Burke, principal of Waltham 
High School for the past twelve years will retire 
at the end of the current session. 

Mr. Burke is beloved by all the thousands who 
have attended Waltham High School since he has 
been there, and all will feel many regrets at his 
leaving. 

"Although being principal of a large high 
school has its many worries," says Mr. Burke, 
"there are many humorous incidents which will 
give me many pleasures with the completion of 
my school career." 

"One of these that always comes to my mind 
happened when I was a class advisor in my first 
year in Waltham. One day a sophomore came to 
me and asked me what I suggested for a subject 
in which he would be able to do good work. 
Knowing that the student was interested in science, 
I told him that I thought he would enjoy Physics." 

"The next morning the student returned with 
a note from his mother, saying that she could not 
allow her son to take such a course for the family 
had always been, and intended to remain, devoted 
Christian Scientists." 

With the exception of these happy occurrences, 
however, our Principal has had a very hard and 
sometimes rocky road to travel, this being especi- 
ally true in his earlier days. He was born a year 
after the close of the Civil War, on March 16, 
1866, in Norwich, Connecticut. He attended 
Norwich Free Academy, which served as the high 
school for the town youths. 

Only the better of the students attended high 
school then, for a twelve-year education was con- 
sidered even more important than a college de- 
gree is today. 

In spite of all obstacles, however, Mr Burke 
attended college. He went to Wesleyan, situated 
in Middletown, Connecticut, having only enough 
money for one year. He was forced to work his 
way through his last three years of school, and he 



tended furnaces, ran errands, and delivered news- 
papers in order to have the opportunity of finish- 
ing. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts de- 
gree. 

At college he joined the Phi Nu Theta frater- 
nity, and in his senior year he received the honor 
among honors which can come to a college stu- 
dent, for he was admitted to Phi Beta Kappa, an 
honorary fraternity throughout the country. 

After he graduated, he became a teacher at 
Westfield High School, where he taught Physics 
and Geology for two years, and resided directly 
across the street from former Governor Joseph B. 
Ely of this state. 

Being offered a better position at Monson 
Academy, also in Massachusetts, he joined the 
faculty of that school in the capacity of sub- 
master, and later became principal, an office which 
he held for six years. 

In 1898 he attended Harvard University, study- 
ing Physics in Graduate School. The following 
year he came to Waltham High School, where he 
has been for the past 37 years. 

One of the first examinations he gave at Wal- 
tham, while teaching, was in a Physics class. One 
of the questions he asked was: "What is a 
vacuum?" 

On one paper came this reply: "A vacuum is a 
great empty space where the Pope lives." Im- 
mediately Mr. Burke realized that he was to en- 
joy life in Waltham. 

He conducted classes for twenty-five years dur- 
ing which time he established courses in Astron- 
omy and Geology. Upon the death of Willis 
Eaton in 1924, Mr. Burke was elected principal, 
this event taking place in April. Thus for over 
twelve years he has served as the guiding light 
for Waltham's younger manhood and womanhood. 

During these years he has graduated over four 
thousand students, and during this time almost 
seven thousand have attended the High School 
during one time or another. He served as faculty 
manager of football from 1903 until 1924, and 



THE MIRROR, 1936 



also led 4 delegations of twenty or more members 
of the senior class in an educational tour through 
Washington, D. C. in 1905 to 1909. 

In 1919 Mr. Burke married Miss Gertrude E. 
Mayo of Brookline, Mass. 

He has made ten trips to Europe since the turn 
of the century, visiting every country on the 
continent, and taking over two thousand pictures 
of his travels. Twelve hundred of these have been 
made into lantern slides, and one of Mr. Burke's 
joys comes in showing some of these to various 
organizations and clubs. 

When the World War broke out in 1914 Mr. 
Burke was in Switzerland. He was detained there 
for several days, and then started for home, going 
through Germany. After he retires he intends to 
continue his travels in Europe, as well as to visit 
parts of the United States. 

When our Principal does not go to Europe dur- 
ing a summer vacation, one may find him by the 
ocean at Pigeon Cove, Rockport. He intends to 
spend many more happy summers at this resort. 

Mr. Burke still has his mother, who encouraged 
Irm through his hardships during youth. He also 
has a good friend in Guy B. Dolbeare, who is now 
President of one of the largest savings banks in 
Connecticut. These two loyal friends see each 
other at least once a year. 

Under Principal Burke's administration the 
school has risen high in scholastic standing, with 
a large percentage of the graduating classes at- 



tending institutions of higher learning. Many of 
these have followed Mr. Burke's precedent, and 
have been honored with Phi Beta Kappa Keys. 

Mr. Burke is a member of the Congregational 
Church, where he is now serving as deacon. He 
is also a member of the Isaac Parker Order of 
Masons, of which he is a Past Master. 

Mr. Burke's hobby is nature study. He has 
gone into extensive research in the study of 
flowers, and while in high school, he wrote up 
"Flora", a catalogue of flowering plants of his 
native town, Norwich, Connecticut. 

The one thing which he would like to see start- 
ed at Waltham High, is the establishment of a 
National Honor Society chapter. This corresponds 
to the Phi Beta Kappa in college. This Society 
has chapters in the leading high schools of the 
country, and may start in Waltham at some early 
date, mainly through the efforts of Mr. Burke. 

Thus ends a brief study of our beloved Princi- 
pal, who is soon to leave the school, but who will 
never be forgotten. The city owes Mr. Burke a 
stirring vote of thanks for all he has done, and 
we all wish him luck in the remaining years of 
his life. May they be many and happy. 

The graduating class of 1936 will be the largest 
one which Mr. Burke has seen leave the walls of 
the school, which has been enlarged mainly 
through his undivided effort, and will be a tribute 
to our honored Principal, who is known lovingly 
among all graduates as "Mucker." 

Frank James Gaziano. 



THE IIEEOE, 1936 



-m : : -:i 



NELLIE L. ADCOCK 

"Nell" 
Ho Kay (a) 
Dancing, Bowling (b) 
Nobody knows (c) 
Committee Work, Commercial 

Club (e) 



CHARLOTTE ANDERSON 

"Lotty", "Andy" 

No? Really? (a) 

Being a good sport (b) 

Ohio (c) 

To own "Big Ben" (d) 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Capt. Bowl- 
ing, 1, 2 ; Hockey, 1, 2, 3 ; 
Commercial Club, Dance Com- 
mittee, Baseball, 1, 3; Volley 
Ball (e) 



BERNICE LUCILE ASELTINE 

"Bunny" 
Thanks a whole bunch (a) 
Embroidering (b) 
To live on Prince Edward Island 

(c) 



JAMES H. P. BAMFORTH 
"Terrence Me Boy", "Jimmie" 

Ain't that awful, Oh! Prunes (a) 

Testing bottles, Playing golf (b) 

She'll decide that (c) 

Selling overshoes to the Arabs 
(d) 

Golf-team, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 
2 (e) 



VIRGINIA BATTYE 
"Jinny" 

Hurry up shrimp (a) 

Listening to the radio (b) 

Wait and see (c) 

To Travel (d) 

Commercial Club, Tennis, Hock- 
ey, Basketball, Baseball (e) 




GRACIANO H. ALLIA 

"Hank", "Al", "Razzmo", 
I'm one of the A. B. C. boys (a) 
Losing golf balls when caddying 

(b) 
Get to heaven on a mule (c) 
To sink one from the double lines 
Get a home run down the Ath- 
letic Field (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1; 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 
Radio Club (e) 



WINTHROP ANDREWS 

"Winnie" 
Yes, suh! (a) 

Collecting old coins, archery (b) 
Tufts (c) 
To go over the Ayer ski jump 

(standing up) (e) 



RICHARD BALTULIS 
"Ritchie", "Dick" 

That's the payoff (a) 

Stamps, Photography, Locomo- 
tives (b) 

Right hand side of locomotive (c) 

Circulation Manager of Herald- 
Traveler Corp. or Locomotive 
Engineer (d) 

Mr. Hollis' right-hand locker 
man (e) 

DOROTHY LOUISE BARRETT 

Just "Dot" to everybody 

More fun! (a) 

Collecting toy dogs (b) 

Maybe college (c) 

To travel (d) 

Vice-President of Senior Class, 3 ; 
Exchange Editor of the "Mir- 
ror", 2, 3 ; Senior Dance Com- 
mittee, 3 ; Picture Committee, 
3 ; Dramatic Club, 3 ; Candy 
Girl of Senior and Dramatic 
Club Plays, 3 ; Junior Dance 
Com., 2 ; Cafeteria, 3 ; Field 
Hockey, 1 ; Baseball, 1 ; Bowl- 
ing, 2, 3; Tennis, 2; Archery, 
3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



MARTORIE W. BEAL 
"Muffy", "Muggsie" 
That's an idea! (a) 
Sewing (b) 
Wellesley College (c) 
To be a dress designer (d) 
Dramatic Club, 2, 3; Junior 
Prom Committee, 2 ; Senior 
Dance Committee, 3 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE IIEROE, 1936 



BARBARA BEATRICE BEEBE 

"Bobbie" 
"Aw Gee!, "Hey Toots" (a) 
Dancing (b) 
A hospital (c) 
Become some part of a Hospital 

(d) 
Field Hockey, 1 (e) 



CHARLES WILLIAM BELL 
"Charlie", "Doc" 

Watch out there ! Don't work too 
hard (a) 

Foreign correspondence, stamp- 
collecting and swimming (b) 

Mass. Nautical School (c) 

To Travel (d) 

Dramatic Club (e) 



DORIS ELEANOR BENNETT 

"Dot", "Ginger" 
I ain't got none (a) 
Studying for tests? (b) 
I'll know when I get there (c) 



(b) 



NATALIE L. BENNETT 

"Nat" 
Oh, for goodness sakes, What's 

s'matter? (a) 
Doing French in advance 
A Secretarial School (c) 
To be a Typewriting Teacher (d) 
Bowling, WHS. Champion, 2 ; 

Class Team and Varsity, 1, 2, 

3 ; Baseball, Archery, Tennis, 

Volley Ball (e) 



ESTHER ETTA BERNSTEIN 

"Toots" 
As long as you're healthy what 

do you care (a) 
Dancing (b) 
New York (c) 








lb £ 111 ' wl 




RENE G. BEGIN 

"Begin", "Beans" 

Geez (a) 
Reading Detective Stories (b) 
Weston Golf Club (c) 
Golfing, Hockey (e) 



MARY JENNETTE BENINAT1 

"May" 
Isn't that sad? (a) 
Writing Short Stories (b) 
College (c) 



LAWRENCE A. BENNETT 
"Beansy" 

It's immaterial to me, That's 

what you think (a) 

Basketball, Swimming and Div- 
ing (b) 

Unknown (c) 

Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 
3; Baseball, 1 (d) 



IRVING BERMAN 

"ig", "iggy" 

Why? Did you hear this one? 

(a) 
Tennis, Reading, Skiing (b) 
West Point (c) 
Metallurgical Engineer (d) 
Dramatic Club Play, 3 ; Senior 

Play Cast, Football, 1 ; Honor 

Roll, 1, 2, 3; Radio Broadcast 

W. N. A. C. (e) 



DONALD BILLINGS BERRY 

"Don" 
Aw, What of it? (a) 
Chemistry, Photography (b) 
Chemical Engineer — N.Y.U. (c) 
Membership Committee of Com- 
mercial Club, (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE IIEBOE, 1936 



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PARKER BERRY 
"Red" 

You're out in right field with a 
boxing glove (a) 

Sports (b) 

A radio sports announcer (c) 

To pitch against Newton and beat 
them (d) 

Jr. Prom Com., Sr. Dance Com., 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 2; 
Basketball, Dramatic Club (Ra- 
dio Plays), Football, 3; Mirror 
Agent (e) 



CELIA D. BLACKSTONE 

"Dot" 
That will be the day (a) 
Reading (b) 

Work where ever I find job (c) 
Work in a large department store 

(d) 
Junior Red Cross agent (e) 






ROY BOMENGEN 

"Bomey", "Joe Pete", "Clown" 
When do we eat? (a) 
Driving baby carriages (b) 
To find South Center, Waltham 

(c) 
Find the girl of long, lost dreams. 

To please G. M. G. (d) 
Soph. Social Com., Jr. Prom. 

Com., Sr. Dance Com., Sr. 

Play Usher (e) 



FRANCIS BOSS 

"Franny", "Bossy" 
So what? (a) 
Athletics (b) 
You tell me (c) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 

2, 3; Commercial Club, 3 (e) 



MABEL FRANCES BRITT 

"Brittie" 
Sum Fun, Isn't it Ducky! (a) 
Raising Pink Elephants (b) 
Paris in the Spring (c) 
To meet the Man in the Moon 

Over Miami (d) 
Commercial Club (e) 






THELMA BIANCONI 

"Thel" 
Tatting (b) 
College (c) 
Private Kindergarten Teacher 

(d) 
Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 

3; Bowling, 1, 2; Basketball, 

2, 3; Hobby Show, 2 (e) 



GEORGE H. BOLTON 

"Bo", "Cliff" 

Are ya trying to be foolish? 
I'm one of the A. B. C. boys 
(a) 

Playing cards at Healey's (b) 

With Miss Rockwood's Buga- 
boos (c) 

To be a Governor so I can par- 
don Allia and Curran from 
Sing Sing (d) 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1; 
Dadio Club, Bowling (e) 



EDWIN F. BOOTH, JR. 

"Eddie", "Bud" 
When do we eat? S'matter? (a) 
Aeronautics, Radio (b) 
Tufts (c) 
To have an automobile for dances 

To pass certain college boards 

(d) 
Dram. Club, 3 ; Dram. Club 
Play, 3; Sr. Play, 3; Hockey, 
1, 3; Radio Club, 1, 3 (e) 



OLIVE D. BOYNTON 
"Ollie", "Odd" 

Keep in touch (a) 

Drawing, Singing, and Studying 
Human Life (b) 

Lasall Jr. College (c) 

To make somebody out of my- 
self (d) 

Member of Com. Club and Dram. 
Club, Promptress of Sr. Play 
(e) 



DOROTHY LOUISE BROWN 
"Dot" 

Je Ne Sais (a) 

Stamp Collecting, Drawing, Writ- 
ing (b) 

Business School (c) 

Be an artist and a writer (d) 

Archery Team, 2, 3; Bowling, 2, 
3; Hobby Show, 2 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, {e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1936 



FRED E. BROWN 
"Brownie", "Red" 
Prove it (a) 

Watching other people (b) 
Quien Sabe? (c) 



MARTHA RICE BRYDEN 
"Frosty Face", "Artha" 

Time Out, There he is! (a) 

Minding Juniors (b) 

Paradise (c) 

To grow up gracefully (d) 

Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Volley Ball, 
3; Bowling, 2, 3; Archery, 
Red Cross, 2 (e) 



2, 

2; 



ROBERT JAMES CAMPBELL 

"Bob", "Chub" 
Hy Kid (a) 
Aviation, Reading (b) 
Harvard Technical (c) 
To make the grade to West Point. 

See the United States (d) 
Dramatic Club, Basketball, 1, 2, 

3 (e) 



SYLVIA MILDRED CAPLAN 

"Cappy" 
Aw! Nuts! (a) 
Bowling, Knitting (b) 
Unknown (c) 
To be a private secretary to some 

wealthy lawyer (d) 
Basketbell Team, Dramactic Club, 

1 ,2, 3; Archery, 1 (e) 



FREDERICK CARLEY 

"Freddy" 
Yah don't say (a) 
Skiing, Tennis (b) 
B. U. (c) 

To reach college (d) 
Radio Club (e) 




JEWEL BROWN 
"Julie", "Sugar" 

Wanta buy some? (a) 

Collecting Souvenirs, Knitting 
(b) 

Holland (c) 

To get a good job (d) 

Soph. Dance Com, 1 ; Jr. Prom. 
Com., 2 ; Chairman Dram. Club 
Executive Com., 3 ; Chairma i 
D. C. Play, 3; Cast of D. C. 
Play, 3 ; Sr. Play Com., 3 ; Tea 
Dance Com., 2 ; Coach one-a:i: 
D. C. Play, 2; Honor Roll, 1, 
2, 3; Lunch Counter, 3 (e) 



ALICE GEORGIA CAMPBELL 

"Al", "Allie", "Soupy", 
Oh swish! (a) 
Having a good time (b) 
Home after twelve (c) 
Some day I'll find out (d) 
Social Com., 2 ; Radio Broadcast, 

2, 3; Dram. Club, 1, 2, 3; Sr. 

Play Com., 3 ; Vice Pres. Dram. 

Club, 3 (e) 



PAUL LIVINGSTONE CANE 

"Fish", "Killer" 
Hay Yank, No Dice! (a) 
Dancing, Swimming (b) 
Unknown (c) 
To fly (d) 
Band, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



CHARLOTTE B, CARLEY 

"Charlie" 
Be good now! and Thank you, 

Kind Sir! (a) 
Chewing Gum! (b) 
Who knows? (c) 
To be a Technician (d) 
Baseball, 1, 3; Volley Ball, 2, 3; 

Bowling, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



JEANNE CARNEY 

"Bunny" 
I luv yah! Not that! (a) 
Planning imaginary homes (b) 
Wherever Tootsies grow (c) 
To be a good interior decorator 

(d) 
Sr. Play Com., Bowling, 1, 2, 3; 
Baseball, 2, 3 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1936 



ROBERT D. CARPENTER 

"Yank" 
Smack! Smack! Oh-h-h-h (a) 
E. D. (b) 

Coast Guard Academy (c) 
To be Commander Carpenter (d) 
Band, 1, 2, 3 (e) 

"Tiby" 



C. CASELLA 



ELIZABETH D. CASTNER 
"Betty", "Bets" 

Indubitably! (a) 

Reading, Walking (b) 

Simmons College (c) 

To be a Librarian (d) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Mirror Lit- 
erary Staff, 2, 3 (e) 



FRANK CAUGHEY 

"Legs" 
So what? (a) 
Air-plane Models (b) 
Civil Service Worker (I hope) 

(c) 
Own and fly a plane (d) 



WILLIAM B. CHILDS, JR. 

"Bill,", "Billy- 
Boo! (and then they shot the 

man) (a) 
Boats — Manomet (b) 
Post-Grad.— B. U. (c) 
Own a 38 foot Chris Craft (d) 
Sr. Play, 3; Dram. Club, 2, 3; 

Cheer Leader, 2, 3; one-act 

Play (Dram. Club), 2, 3; 3 

Radio Broadcasts (e) 




MARGARET SIANO CARUSO 

"Babe", "Margy" 

Dancing (b) 

California (c) 

To become a good sales girl (d) 

Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2; 
Volley Ball, 2 ; Bowling, 1,2; 
Bowling Mgr., 3 ; Baseball, 1, 
2; Archery, 2, 3; Basketball 
Mgr., 3; Dance Com., 1, 2; 
Honor Roll, 1,2,3; Commer- 
cial Club, 3 ; Dram. Club, 2 
(e) 



CONSTANCE CASELLA 

"Connie" 
Oh My Goodness! (a) 
Driving, Listening to the Radio 

< b > 

Be an Aviatrix (c) 

See the world (d) 



WOODROW CATALDO 

"Woodie" 
Yah?, No Fooling! (a) 
Guns (b) 

Dartmouth College (c) 
English professor (hot stuff) (d) 
Mirror Staff, 2, 3; Class Auditor, 

2; Football Usher, 2 (e) 



DORIS O. CHARNLEY 

"Nora", "Dorie" 
Honest 'n Druly, 'Member Me 

(a) 
Hooking Menus (b) 
Secretarial School (c) 
To boss the President of the 

United States (d) 
Commercial Club, Dram. Club, 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 

Reporter in Commercial Club, 

Sr. Play Com., Sr. Dance Com. 

(e) 



WILLIAM CHRISTIE 

"Bill" 
So? — That's rare! (a) 
Women (b) 
Bentley (c) 
Commercial Club (e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1936 



JOHN CLAVIN 

"Cowboy", "Pan-cho" 
Razz-ma-Tazz ; Hot Ziggitty (a) 
Playing Dummie Orchestra (b) 
India (c) 
Be able to hit a golf ball straight 

(d) 
Soph. Treas., Football, 3; Jr. 
Prom Com., Sr. Dance Com., 
Chmn, Assembly Commercial 
Club, Tennis, Golf (e) 



SAMUEL J. COLLURA 

"Sam" 
What's up Punchdounk (a) 
Sports (b) 
Who knows? (c) 
Football, 1; Baseball, 1, 3 (e) 



LLOYD CRIMI 

"Sunshine", "Menu" 
See any dictionary for details (a) 
Postmarks, Stamps and Baseball 

- (b) 

A Typotect in a Printing Co. (c) 
Student Council, 3; Ticket Com. 
Trade School Dance, 3; De- 
signer of Poster, 2 ; and Tickets 
for Dance, 3; Intra-Mural Bas- 
ketball and Baseball, 1, 2, 3 
(e) 



FRANK CURRAN 

"Windy" 
That's Silly (a) 
Collecting golf tees (b) 
To the land of the bugaboos (c) 
To become a Golf Pro — Where? 

(d) 
Basket Ball, 1, 2, 3; Golf, 1, 

Radio Club (e) 



ROBERT CUTTING 

"Bob", "Money Man" 
I'll take care of it (a) 
Being the silent assistant (b) 
Wherever I can find success (c) 
To be a business executive (d) 
Cafeteria, Mirror, 1, 2, 3; Mem- 
bership Com., Commercial 
Club, Sr. Play Com., Christmas 
Carols, 3 (e) 




DOROTHY L. COGSWELL 

"Dot" 

Don't let it get yuh! Keed! (a) 

Eating apples in Room 115, 
thanks to Mr. Hodge (b) 

Bowdoin College (c) 

To chew gum undisturbed in 
Room 115 (d) 

Field Hockey, 1,2; Varsity, Bas- 
ketball, 2; Bowling, 1, 2; Base- 
ball, 1, 2; Archery, 2; Knitting 
Club, 3; Volley Ball, 2 (e) 



BERNARD T. COYLE 

"Bernie" 
Not so's ya could notice it. 

Quiet! ! ! (a) 
Lugging ice (b) 
The bridge of a battle ship (c) 
Naval Officer (d) 
Baseball, 1; Basketball, 2, 3 (e) 



HELEN CRONIN 
"Fat", "Hie" 

Quit ya Kidding (a) 

Collecting Samples (b) 

Arizona (c) 

To become a Teacher (d) 

Sr. Play, Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Arch- 
ery, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Knitting Club, 3; Hockey, 1, 
2; Dram. Club, 3; Soccer, 2, 
3; Bowling, 1 (e) 



LEONARD CURRAN 

"Jake", "Rabbit" 
Choke the Fish (a) 
Golf, Swimming (b) 
National — Open (c) 
To win the New England Inter- 
scholastic — and Wm. Randolf 

Hearst Golf Tourney and to 

throw Mr. A. Tennyson Hodge 

(d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 
Football, (Capt.) Golf, 1, 2; 

(Capt) Tennis, 1, 2; Dram. 

Club (e) 



MAURICE DANIELS 
"Jake", "Danno" 

That will be the day. Please (a) 

Hunting girls (b) 

Unknown (c) 

Have a jazz band and tour the 
world (d) 

Hockey, Hunting, Horseback Rid- 
ing, Baseball, Basketball, 2 ; 
Golf, Orchestra, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, {b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIBROR, 1936 



MARION B. DAVIS 

"Mayon" 

Quite (a) 

Reading, Writing, Stamp-collect- 
ing (b) 

Private Secretary (c) 

Sec. of Commercial Club, Sec. of 
Mirror, Honor Roll, 3 (e) 



DONNA DERBYSHIRE 
"Donnie" 

Well— That's Nice (a) 

Collecting Souvenirs, Poems (b) 

I'm shooting high (c) 

To Travel (d) 

Orchestra, 1, 2; Baseball, 1, 2, 3 
Field Hockey, 1, 2, 3 ; Basket 
ball, 1, 2, 3; Archery, 2, 3 
Bowling, 1, 2 ; Dram. Club 
Chmn. Dram. Club Dance, 3 
Candy Girl Sr. Play, Cafeteria, 
3 (e) 



RUTH DOUCETT 
"Doot", "Ruthie" 
Tarezoots, O. K. (a) 
Dancing, Skating (b) 
California (c) 
Commercial Club, 3; Tennis (e) 



JOHN EATON 
"Johnny" 

Hey, Don't Rush Me! (a) 

Sports (b) 

M.I.T., Business executive (c) 

M.I.T. Millionaire (d) 

Sec.-Treas. Radio Club, 1 ; Ass't. 
Editor-in-Chief, 2 ; Dram. Club, 
2, 3 ; Red Cross Vol., 2 ; Treas. 
Dram. Club, 3; Editor-in-Chief 
Mirror, 3 ; Sound Effects Dram. 
Club W.N.A.C, 3; Honor 
Roll, 1, 2, 3; Class Rep., Ki- 
wanis Club, 3 ; Head Usher 
Dram. Club Play, 3; Sr. Play 
Com. Chrm., 3 (e) 



WILLIAM JOHN EDMUNDS 

"Cremo", "Smasher", "Man- 
drake" 

Unprintable (a) 

M. M., Avoiding work (b) 

California to escape people tell- 
ing me of P. D.'s conceit (c) 

To find a way to avoid work (d) 

Football, 1 (e) 




FRANCES J, DI MURRO 
"Fran" 

Holy Cow (a) 

Breaking Dishes (b) 

South Sea Islands (c) 

To take at least one trip around 
the world (d) 

Bowling, 1 ; Basketball, 1 ; Base- 
ball, 1; Hockey, 1; Honor 
Roll, 1, 2, 3 ; Commercial 
Club, 3 (e) 



PAUL ERNEST DINSMORE 

"Red". "Dinsy", "Pepper" 
Censored (a) 
A. Q., Swimming (b) 
Anywhere where Edmunds isn't 

(c) 
To sell swastika's to the French 

(d) 
Basketball, 1, 2; Football, 2, 3 

(e) 



BLANCHE M. DROZ 

Gee I'm tired (a) 

Collecting souvenirs, especially 
scarfs, Sports (b) 

Switzerland (c) 

To see Marion ride a bicycle — To 

see "Bun" play football (d) 

Hockey, 1; Baseball, 1, 2; Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 3; 
Commercial Club 3 (e) 



WILLIAM EDGAR 

"Bill", "Etch" 
It's been so long (a) 
Buying popular orchestra record- 
ings (b) 
Waverley Naval Academy (c) 
Getting the wife a good job (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2; Dram. Club, 3 
(e) 



ELIZABETH GORDON ELDER 

"Betty" 
You're the Boss. I only Work 

Here (a) 
Piano; Reading (b) 
Boston University (c) 
To play the piano like Edith 

Stearns (d) 
Dramatic Club, Orchestra, 3 ; 

Field Hockey, 2 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, {d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIEROE, 1936 



VICTORIA ELDRIDGE 

"Dee Dee" 
You Can't Fool Me, I'm too 

Ignorant (a) 
Horseback riding, Knitting, 

Bowling (b) 
A $50 a week position (c) 
To marry a certain artist (d) 
Room Agent for Mirror, 1, 2; 

Dram. Club, 3; Candy Girl Sr. 

Play (e) 



PHYLLIS VIRGINIA ELSMORE 

"Phil" 
So what? Choose your pick (a) 
Music, Reading, Dancing (b) 
Simmons College (c) 
To be Head-Librarian of a small 

town library (d) 
R.ed Cross, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 

3; (e) 







FRANKLIN ELLIS 

"Fuanky", "Funk" 
Let's Get Going (a) 
Railroads and R. R. Photographs 

(b) 
Northeastern (c) 
Locomotive Designer (d) 



MARY EVANGELISTA 

"Mitzi" 
Gee! (a) 

Making Scrapbooks (b) 
To be married (c) 



BENNY EVANGELISTA 

"Benny", "The Boom Boom" 
Some Fun, I'll Say (a) 
Dancing (b) 
Broadway (c) 

To become a dancing expert (d) 
Orchestra, 1, 2 (e) 



DOMINIC FERRELLI 

"Dog", "Dom", "Hook" 
Oh, You Bugaboo (a) 
Burning butts at recess (b) 
Land of the Bagaboos (c) 
To be a Rabbi (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2; Track, 3; Read- 
ing Club (e) 



MABEL FOSTER FISHER 

"Fish", "Friday" 
I Don't Know (a) 
Eating apples in Mr. Hodge's 

Room (b) 
Cambridge, Mass. or England (c) 
To get by Saint Peter at the 

Golden Gates (d) 
Baseball, 1; Knitting Club, 3 

(e) 




DONALD M. FARNSWORTH 

"Donkey", "Don" 
Well for Gosh Sakes (a) 
Stamp collecting (b) 
To have a business of my own 

(0 
Basketball, 1 ; Commercial Club, 

(e) 



JOHN WALTER FINK, JR. 

"Pa" 
Hey Fish! You Clown! Oh-h-h 

(a) 
ShooLing ? ? ? (b) 
Ranger (c) 
To sprout wings, besides my ears 

(d) 



VIRGINIA LOIS FRASER 

"Ginny" 
I Don't Care, I Know Someone 

Else (a) 
Dancing, Drawing, Knitting (b) 
Three months in Hawaii (c) 
To reach the top in Nursing (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1. 

2, 3; Hockey, 1, 2 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIKKOK, 1936 



CHARLES FRECHETTE 



WILLARD J. FRYE 

"Frye" 
Quiet, Please (a) 
Playing the Piano (b) 
Who knows? (c) 
To be a G-Man (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2; Golf, 3 (e) 



CLARA LOUISE GAINES 

"Weese" 
Oh! ! ! for Goodness Sakes (a) 
Dancing the Portland Fancy with 

an old Hick (b) 
Art School (c) 

- $ * $, $ $ $ (d) 
Red Cross, Honor Roll, Art Club, 
Mirror Agent, Comm. Club 
(e) 



RUTH EDNA GARFINK 

"Scottie", "Ruthie" 
Okey Dokey (a) 
Collecting Scottie dog pins (b) 
Unknown (c) 
To make good (d) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



THELMA RUTH GELLER 

No Joke! ! (a) 

Driving, Tennis (b) 

Unknown (c) 

To get my car whenever I want 

it (d) 
Dramatic Club, 2, 3; Executive 

Board of Dramatic Club, 2; 

Honor Roll, 1, 2 (e) 




DOROTHY W. FRYE 
"Dot" 

Isn't That a Scream (a) 
Waiting for Jeanie to go to 

Church (b) 
England (c) 
To Travel (d) 
Archery, 2 ; Swimming, Tennis 

(e) 



MARJORIE FURBUSH 
"Margie", "Midge" 

More Fun, Cutie? (a) 

Dancing, Knitting, Cooking (b) 

Head Dietition in large institu- 
tion (c) 

To be successful in whatever I 
attempt (d) 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 2, 3; 
Hockey, 2, 3; Gym Meet, 1; 
Dram. Club, 2, 3; Sec. of 
Dram. Club, 3; Sec.-Treas. of 
Class, 2, 3; Sr. Dance Com., 
Chairman of Candy for Dram. 
Club Play, Candy Girl for Sr. 
Play, (e) 

WILLIAM J. GANNON 

"Kiaser" 
Don't Let It Throw You (a) 
Repairing Automobiles (b) 
Worcester Polytech (c) 
Become a Civil Engineer (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 

2; Football, 1; Hockey, 1; 

Radio Club (e) 



FRANK JAMES GAZIANO 
"Barnie", "Gazie", "Franc" 
How ya doin' keed (a) 
Magnificent Obsession (b) 
Bowdoin College (c) 
To be a success in life (d) 
Capt. Football, 3; Chrm. Soph. 
Dance, Chrm. Jr. Social, Pic- 
ture Com., Dram Club, 1, 2, 
3; Sr. Play Usher, Usher at 
Class Day and Graduation, 
WNAC Radio Broadcasts, Sr. 
Dance Com., Member of Soph. 
Social Com., Football, 1, 2, 3 ; 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 
2, 3; Track, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 
1, 2; School reporter (e) 
"Tiby" 



YVONNE LUCY GIBBS 

"Gibby", "Evie" 
But when you stop to think (a) 
Swimming (b) 
Burdett College (c) 
See Yellowstone National Park 

and the Grand Canyon (d) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, {b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIEEOE, 1936 



EDNA BARBARA GLADEN 

"Eddy", "Swede", "Gladinie" 
You Sissy, I mean — -you know 

(a) 
Eating Tuna Fish sandwishes (b) 
Where He is (c) 
To go to West Point with Esther 

(d) 
Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Class Team, 3; 

Bowling, 1, 2; Basketball, 2, 

3; Baseball, 1, 2; Class Team 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Honor 

Roll (e) 

PAUL GOLDMAN 

"Pinney", "Pinsy", "Pins" 
I'm a minute man — When I say 

something I "min it" (a) 
Dramatics — ? ? ? (b) 
Mass. College of Pharmacy (c) 
To play second gong to Major 

Bowes (d) 
Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 

1; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Sr. Play 

Com., 3 ; 3 Radio Broadcasts, 

3 ; Sr. Play Cast, 3 ; Honor 

Roll, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



DON R. GREEN 
"Spatsy" 

Let's snare the rabbit (a) 

Getting into trouble (b) 

Who cares? (c) 

To play "Tiger Rag" on the 
Church chimes (d) 

Baseball, 1 ; Cheerleader, 2 ; 
Baseball, 2; Football, 2; Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (e) 



MILDRED A. GRIERSON 

"Millie", "Curly" 
So what! (a) 

Dancing and more dancing (b) 
Over the hills and far away (c) 
To get my man (d) 
Commercial Club (e) 



RASARIO GIULIANO 

"Savi" 

'Tis a mere trifle (a) 

Reading (b) 

Ethiopia (c) 

Treas. of Commercial Club, Hon- 
or Roll (e) 





■- 






ALFRED GLEDHILL 

"Al", "Slim", "Junior" 
Hi mine fran, and Haloy Stran- 
ger (a) 
Making stone walls around Wor- 
cester Insane Asylum (b) 
Maine or Boston — J. M. (c) 
To captivate the business world 

(d) 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1; 
Hockey, 1 ; Jr. Prom Chrm., 
Sr. Dance Com., Sr. Play 
Usher, Dram. Club, Picture 
Com. (e) 



ROBERT A. GOLDMAN 

"Rube", "Bob", "Roby", 
Likewise, the same (a) 
Toot in a Saxophone (b) 

? (c) 

Get some sleep (d) 

Orchestra, 1; Band, 1, 2, 3; Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2, 3; Radio Club, 
1, 3 (e) 



RICHARD D. GREEN 

"Dick", "Greenie", "Richy", 
"Rich" 

Aw shucks, Hya Toots (a) 

Stamp collecting, Traveling, 
Sports, Cracking the Quip (b) 

Go around the world, then stay 
in Waltham (c) 

To see Republicans back in con- 
trol (d) 

Honor Roll, Dramatic Club, Dra- 
matic Club Radio Broadcasts, 
Room Agent for Mirror, Foot- 
ball Usher (e) 



HARRIS MORTON GRIFF 

"Griffy", "Sam" 
Who's a liar? (a) 
Knocking Riseberg (b) 
Tufts (c) 
To teach Miss Caswell correct 

French (d) 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 

2,3; Dramatic Club, 3 ; Honor 

Roll, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



ALICE GUINEY 

"Ollie" 
Gee Whiz (a) 
Writing letters (b) 
It's only a hope (c) 
To travel out West 
Dramatic Club (e) 



(d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROK, 1936 



RALPH GUSTAVSEN 
"Gus", "Gussie", "Rusty 

Hy Kid, What did cha do last 
night (a) 

Taking it easy (b) 

Waverley's institute of technol- 
ogy (c) 

Mayor of Waverley (d) 

Hockey 2; (e) 



LYNNWOOD HARON 



JEAN D. HARRINGTON 

"Jaybie", "Jeanie" 

Ooh Dear! Oh stop it! Oh, My 
Charlie! (a) 

Fighting with "Cubie" (b) 

I have none — I'm a stranger here 
— Heaven's my home (c) 

To become a criminologist. Study 
at Chicago University and An- 
tiock College (d) 

Field Hockey, Basketball, Base- 
ball, Bowling, Dram. Club (e) 



FRANCIS LEO HEASLIP 

"Skeet" 
How Do Gals, My Dime is 

Your Dime (a) 
Drawing, Gardening (b) 
North and South Poles (c) 
To travel around the world (d) 
Football, 1; Cafe, 3; Track, 1 

(e) 



HARRY G. HIGGINS 

"Hie" 
Hey-Hey! When you laugh at 

me, smile! (a) 
Aeronautics (b) 
Flying School (c) 
Wear plaid shirts (d) 
Basketball, 1, 3; Orchestra, 1, 3; 

Band, 1, 2, 3 (e) 




WALTER M. HAGEN 
"Hague" 

Me too (a) 

Golf (b) 

See the world (c) 

To be a leader of a famous or- 
chestra (d) 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



ELWOOD HARPER 

"Al", "Harpo", "Woody" 
You Can Tell (a) 
Collecting match covers (b) 
W. P. A. (University (c) 
To be a soldier of fortune (d) 






GEORGE B. HARRIS, JR. 

Nicht-Wahr, I've got another 
joke (a) 

Music, Reading, Swimming (b) 

M. I. T. (c) 

Somewhere on top (d) 

Basketball, 1 ; Orchestra, 1 ; Band, 
1, 2, 3; Jr. Prom Com., 2; Pic- 
ture Com., 3 ; Literary Staff of 
the Mirror, 2 ; Music Editor of 
Mirror, 3 ; Honor Roll, 1,2 3 
(e) 



RICHARD HENRY 

"Whimpy" 
What else? (a) 
Studying (b) 

Where good luck takes me (c) 
To become a student sometime 

(d) 
Band, Orchestra, 1, 2 (e) 



WILLIAM R. HITCHCOCK 
"Bucko", "Bill" 

You're a Senior, be Dignified (a) 

Model Building, Collecting Neck- 
ties (b) 

W. H. S., P. G. (c) 

To pass West Point Exams, To 
Travel, To make a million — 
and save it. (d) 

Band, Basketball, Baseball, Foot- 
ball, Track, Dramatic Club, 
Pies, of O. F. F., Camelot, 1, 
2, 3 (e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (<?) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1936 



: '-- ' 'M'?'v, v 



MIRIAM HOLICKER 
"Mickey" 

No Kidding! (a) 

Dancing, Swimming, Skating (b) 

Wherever I'll land (c) 

To see the world (d) 

Field Hockey, Class Team, Bowl- 
ing, Class Team, Baseball, Bas- 
ketball, Commercial Club, Hon- 
or Roll (e) 



LEONARD A. ISAACSON 
"Swede", "Ike", "Svenska" 

Just another piece of dandruff 
trying to get ahead in the 
world (a) 

Making up excuses for "Don" G. 

(b) 
Back to the old country (Sweden) 

(c) 
To be a success (d) 

Baseball, 1, 2; Football, 1; Com- 
mercial Club (e) 



EDGAR JOHNSON 

"Ed", "Eddy", "Swede" 
Is dot so, you're screwy (a) 
Aviation, Music (b) 
Norwich (?) (c) 
To someday pilot a Transoceanic 

air transport (d) 
Golf, 3; Baseball, 1; Band, l, 2, 

3; Orchestra, 2, 3; Basketball, 

1, 3 (e) 



PHYLLIS M. JOHNSON 

"Dutchie", "Phil" 
No kidding! (a) 
Athletics (b) 
Wilfred Academy (c) 
To succeed in my work (d) 
Hockey Varsity, Class Team, 2, 
3; Basketball, 2, 3; Bowling 
Varsity, 1; Class Team, 1, 2, 
3 ; Volley Ball Class Team, 2 ; 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Tennis, 2, 
3 (e) 



MAURICE JONES 

"Physicies" 
Railroad Engine picture 

ing (b) 
Railroad President (c) 



collect- 




Auitai 




A. LOUISE HOLMES 
"Lou" 

A-l-1-1 Right (a) 

Knitting (b) 

Radcliffe College (c) 

To study surgical chemistry (d) 

Soph. Social Com., Orchestra, 1, 
2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2; 
Knitting Club, Sr. Play, Cafe- 
teria, 3; Assembly Pianist (e) 



WINIFRED I. ISAACSON 

"Winnie" 
Just a minute, One never knows 

(a) 
Movies and Piano (b) 
College (c) 
To travel (d) 
Basketball, Tennis, Honor Roll 

(e) 



ELIZABETH M. JOHNSON 
"Betty" 

I dunno! May I be excused? (a) 

Riding, Tennis, Knitting, Swim- 
ming, Animal-Novelties (b) 

Training (c) 

To be successful in whatever I 
undertake (d) 

Freshman Dance Com., Dramatic 
Club, 2, 3; Knitting Club, 3; 
Jr. Prom Com. (e) 



BLANCHE I. JONES 
"Fat" 

Don't ask me (a) 

Going to Belmont (b) 

Anywhere (c) 

To become a nurse or an assistant 
to a doctor (d) 

Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1; Hock- 
ey, 2 ; Gym Meet, 1 ; Bowling, 
1; Archery, 2, 3 (e) 



THERESA B. KOTSIFAS 
"Tree", "Tessie", "Sally" 

That'll be the day, Whatcha 
Doin' (a) 

Dancing, Music, Drawing (b) 

Hollywood (c) 

To be a dancer and travel (d) 

Commercial Club, Reading Club 
(e) 



L ..~N 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE IIEKOE, 193C 



VIVIENNE G. KATSOGIANIS 

"Minnie Mouse" 
H'lo Darlin' (a) 
Music, Dramatics, Aviation (b) 
Radio (c) 

Marry King of England (d) 
Honor Student, Commercial and 

Dramatic Clubs (e) 






JACK KEATING 

"Chickens" 
What's it to ya (a) 
To follow up pro — sports (b) 
To see California (c) 
To play professional hockey. 

(Boston Bruins) (d) 
Basketball, 2, 3(e) 



DOROTHY ANN KEEFE 

"Dot" 
Oh My! (a) 
Fancy work (b) 
I wonder? (c) 
Agent for Jr. Red Cross, 2 ; 

Agent for Mirror, 3 (e) 



JOHN CLIFFORD KELLEY 

"Slash" 
Hello (a) 

Seeing "big" bands (b) 
California (c) 
To have an orchestra of my own 

(d) 

All kinds of sports, especially 
Tennis, Dancing and Golf (e) 



SHIRLEY BERNICE KNIZNIK 

"Shirl" 
(After sneezing) God Bless Me 

(a) 
Music (b) 
College (c) 
To be famous (d) 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1; 

Honor Roll (e) 



ROBERT B. LANE 

"Bob" 
Sez You (a) 

Collecting Travel Books (b) 
To be a Traffic Manager (c) 
To take trip around the world 

(d) 
Baseball (e) 




RICHARD KEITH 

"Iggy", "Dick" 
Rare, That'll be the day, You 

said it (a) 
Women and books (b) 
Mayor of Lake View (c) 
Basketball, 1, 2 ; Commercial 

Club, 3 (e) 



RUTH MARY KING 

"Ruthie" 
For Cats' Sake (a) 
Sewing, Crocheting, Knitting (b) 
To go to Dressingmaking School 

(c) 
Basketball, 2; Knitting Club, 3 

(e) 



FRANK W. LANE 

"Wes" 
I don't know, but — (a) 
Hunting (b) 
Harvard (c) 



JOSEPH RIP LANDO 

"Smoky" 
What's new? (a) 
Sports (b) 
U. S. M. A. (c) 
Football Coach (d) 
Football, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE IIREOE, 193 6 



DORIS LASSMAN 

"Doric", "Dobo" 
Is that so (a) 
Music (b) 
Out West (c) 

To see Betty on roller skates (d) 
Commercial Club, Music, Chrm. 

of Commercial Club Alumni 

Committee (e) 



ARTHUR J. LAZAZZERO 

"Art" 
Phooey (a) 
Stamp Collecting (b) 
Unknown (c) 
Become a Globe Trotter (d) 



EDWARD LEBLANC 

"Eddie" 
Is That So? (a) 
Collecting automobile and truck 

pamphlets (b) 
Unknown (c) 
To drive a Greyhound bus or a 

truck on an Interstate Route 

(d) 

Baseball, 1; Basketball, 2; Hock- 
ey, 1 (e) 



MAXINE EVELYN LEE 

"Max" 
What do you suppose I got in 

that test? (a) 
Reading, Sports, Traveling (b) 
Europe (c) 
To be well-educated and to travel 

around the world (d) 
Honor Roll, 3 (e) 




FRANK LITURI 

"Franky" 
Am I Right? (a) 
Checkers and Chess (b) 
Medicine (c) 




MARIE LEONA LAVALLY 
"Lee" 

You're Right There (a) 

Movies, Reading (b) 

Wilfred Academy (c) 

To be a Hairdresser in Ethiopia 
(d) 

Bowling, 2 ; Hockey, 3 ; Commer- 
cial, 3 (e) 



NORMA VIRGINIA LEAF 

"Norm", "Swede" 
Dunno, Why (a) 
Trying to play the piano sitting 

on a certain rack (b) 
N. E. Conservatory of Music (c) 
To have a "Duck" of my own 

(d) 
Dramatic Club, Chrm. of Social 

Service, Commercial Club, 

Bowling (e) 



HERBERT LEE 

"Hoiby" 
Is That So? (a) 
Ping Pong, Tennis (b) 
Tufts College (c) 
Basketball (e) 



WILLIAM A. LITTLEFIELD 

"Bill" 
Aw G'wan, your Kidding (a) 
Cartooning (b) 
Around the world in a Model T 

(c) 
Commercial Club, Football, 1, 2 ; 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 
1 (e) 



JOHN T. LOGAN 
"Chick" 

Take it Easy, What's Up? (a) 

Breaking dates (b) 

College (c) 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 
2, 3 ; Baseball, 3 ; Member of 
Senior Play Committee (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (r) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE IIEEOE, 1936 



HAZEL BERTHA LONG 

"Huey", "Brownie" 
He likes it (a) 

Collecting snapshots; sewing (b) 
A little rendezvous in Honolulu 

(c) 

To join Company F. with Jean- 

nette and Thelma (d) 
Basketball, 2, 3; Archery, 2; Red 

Cross, 3; Baseball, 3 (e) 



WARREN LUCE 

"Lockenvar" 
Bye now; Take it Easy (a) 
Collecting ribbons of Canoe 

Meets (b) 
Rockridge Road (c) 
To be on the U. S. Olympic 

Swimming Team (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



ESTHER H. LUNDQUIST 

"Lundy", "Swede", "Es" 

Want to buy a Ticket? Not 
Really, Only Foolin' (a) 

Collecting Trinkets, Sports, Danc- 
ing (b) 

West and Europe (c) 

Go to West Point with Edna. 
Sell Peter C. a ticket (d) 

Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 1, 2; 
Varsity Baseball, 1, 2 ; Dram. 
Club, 2; Commercial Club, 3; 
Sr. Prom Com., Sr. Dance 
Com., Basketball Dance Com., 
Honor Roll (e) 



THERESA LYNSKEY 
"Terry", "Tree" 

Not really, Do you mind? (a) 

Talking to Blanche in Democracy 
Class ( b) 

Wellesley (c) 

To see Mary do her homework 
(d) 

Basketball, 1 ; Baseball, 2 ; Com- 
mercial Club 3 (e) 



JOHN F. MAGUIRE 
"Mac", "Jack", "Chick", 

So What, Please go away and 
let me sleep (a) 

Radio, Golf (b) 

Northeastern, Bemis Naval (c) 

To teach Dot how to tap dance 

(d) 
Class Officer, 1; Radio Club, 1, 3; 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Band, 1, 
2; Orchestra, 1; Tit-Tat-Too, 
1, 2, 3; Member O. F. F. (e) 




EDWIN LOVEQUIST 
"Ed", "Eddie", "Lovey" 

You don't say (a) 

Stamps, Coins (b) 

Northeastern (maybe?) (c) 

Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 1, 3; 
Football, 1, 3; Basketball (e) 



ANNA LUKE 
"Ann" 

Just Like That (a) 

Skating, Dancing (b) 

There! (c) 

To marry That Millionaire (d) 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Entertain- 
ment Com., 3; Honor Roll, 1, 
2, 3 (e) 



DOMENIC LUPO 

"Lupe", "Dom", "D" 
Hey, Riseberg (a) 
Ping Pong (b) 
Europe (c) 

To par McClelland Barclay (d) 
Baseball Mgr., 2 ; Tennis, 2 ; 

Baseball Mgr., 3; Sr. Play 

Com., 3; Mirror Staff 2, 3; 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



MARION ALICE MacLEOD 
"Mamou" 
Really! That's Swell (a) 

Collecting silk hankies, Memoriz- 
ing Auto registration numbers 
(b) 

Miss Michaud's Secretarial School 

(c) 
To keep Blanche away from 

Banks Square (d) 
Basketball, 3 ; Commercial Club 

(e) 



JOSEPH MALLOY 

"Joe", "Biffer" 
Think it over, Lad (a) 
Reading (b) 
Post Graduate (c) 
Anything but a politician (d) 
Golf, 2, 3 (e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 19 3 6 



THEODORE MALMGREN 

"Ted- 
So What? Hey Commander! 
Quien Sabe! (b) 
Perduka (c) 
Poet Lauriate (d) 



(a) 



CYRILLA M. MANN 
"Gil" 

That will be the day (a) 

Taking Walks (b) 

You tell me (c) 

Hockey Class Team, 1,2; Varsi- 
ty, 2, 3; Basketball Class 
Team, 2, 3 ; Varsity, 2 ; Bowl- 
ing Class Team, 1, 2, 3; Var- 
sity, 1, 2; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; 
Volley Ball, 2 ; Commercial 
Club (e) 



LESLIE MARSHALL 

"Red" 
Oh! All right but this is the last 

Time (a) 
Lending to Jake Powers (b) 
Mass. College of Pharmacy (c) 
To earn enough to pay a sizable 

income tax (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Golf, 2 (e) 



DOLORES FRANCES MARTIN 

"Del" 
Hotcha, I'll bite (a) 
Chinese Curios and walking in 

the rain (b) 
Simmons (c) 

To gain a little avoirdupois (d) 
Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Red 

Cross, 2, 3 (e) 



MARIAN KATHLEEN MAYO 

"Midge" 
Oh Fish (a) 

Going to Barn Dances (b) 
This cold, cold world (c) 
I wouldn't tell that to anyone (d) 
Commercial Club, 3; Bowling, 1, 

2, 3 ; Honor Roll, 3 ; Archery, 

2, 3; (e) 




GEORGE MANDIGO 

"Blondie" 
Why don't you smile? (a) 
Drawing (b) 
Hollywood ot teach Fred Astaire 

to dance (c) 
To be on the Olympic Skating 

Team (d) 
Basketball and Playing Smear 

notes for The Waltham Band 

(e) 



JOSEPH FRANCIS MANN 

"Joe", "Leeny" 
Don't be afraid, only 2.98 (a) 
Golf, Basketball, French (b) 
Tufts College (c) 
To become a bachelor of science 

(d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Golf, 2, 3; 

Cheerleader, 3 (e) 



M. ARDELLE MARTIN 

"Del" 
Ah huh! (a) 
I. McCarthy (b) 
Wherever R. T. is (?) (c) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Commercial 

Club, 3; Candy Girl Sr. Play, 

3 (e) 



ELISABETH C. MATTSON 

"Lisa" 
Hi Bushy (a) 
Dancing, Sewing (b) 
New York City (c) 
Study to be a Model (d) 
Picture Committee, 3 ; Baseball, 

1; Basketball, 2; Hockey, 1 

(e) 



GEORGE McALPINE 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE IIEEOE, 193C 



EDWARD F. McCABE 

"Eddie" 

Don't be afraid! (a) 

You're guess is as good as mine! 
(b) 

West Point Academy (c) 

To do the right thing at the 
right time (d) 

Class Pres., 1, 2, 3; Mirror Staff, 
2, 3; Executive Com. of Dra- 
matic Club, 3; Ex-officio Mem- 
ber of All Committees, 1, 2, 3 ; 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 
1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club Play, 
3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Track, 
2 ; Radio Broadcasts, Capt. of 
Baseball, 3 (e) 



irene j. McCarthy 

"Renee" 
Not Really! (a) 
A. Martin (b) 
Wherever R. T. is (c) 
Honor Roll, Commercial Club 

(e) 



■ " i'. 






alan McCarthy 

"Mac" 
He's out in right field with a 

boxing glove (a) 
Sleeping (b) 

University of W. P. A. (c) 
To drive a herd of Texas steers 

up Broadway at noontime on a 

Saturday (d) 
Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1; 

Tennis, 2, 3 (e) 



TERESO ANNE McDONALD 

"Terrie" 
Oh Shush, I'll Bite (a) 
Doing Fancy Work (b) 
Who knows (c) 
R.ed Cross Agent, 1 (e) 




FLORENCE LOUISE McKEON 

"Flo" 
O Kay (a) 
Music, Movies (b) 
E. C. I. New York to get a 

D. C. (c) 
To see Grace when she has a 

good position in an office (d) 
Commercial Club .(e) 



i 





ELIZABETH McKENNA 

"Betty", "Blondie" 
Is that so! (a) 
Keeping scrap books (b) 
Somebody's Secretary (c) 
Commercial Club (e) 



Wki 



BLANCHE L. McKENNEY 

"Duchess" 
Now listen — ; You bold thing 

(a) 
Dramatics, Theater, Clothes (b) 
Some Business College (c) 
To be a private secretary (d) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 1; 
Tennis, 2; Basketball, 2, 3; 
Volley Ball, 2; Class Volley 
Ball Team, 2; Dram. Club, 3 
"Ryerson Mystery" Cast, 3 
Sr. Play Cast, 3; Bowling, 3 
Ass't. Adv. Mgr., 1, 2; Adv. 
Mgr., 3 (e) 



ARTHUR McMANUS 

"Moxie" 
All-right— O. K. (a) 
Bicycle riding (b) 
Eureka! (c) 
Six-day bicycle race (d) 





■mi-.., .' :]V: .%: . "■ . '■■■" . 



Wk *^k 




HUGH W. McLANE 
"Hooie" 

Don't be afraid (a) 

Amateur Radio (b) 

Northeastern University (c) 

To get a degree from Northeast- 
ern — To become a Radio Ama- 
teur (d) 

Chemistry Laboratory Assistant, 
2, 3; Vice Pres. of Radio Club, 
3 (e) 



JEANNE L. McNICHOL 

"Mac", "Jin" 
Why? (a) 
Dancing (b) 
School of Dietetics (c) 
To be a dietition (d) 
Dramatic Club, Commercial Club. 

Hockey, Basketball (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE IIEKOE, 1936 



ESTHER FULTON MEHRING 

"Es", "Countess" 
Right you are! (a) 
Writing, Piano (b) 
Boston University, C. L. A (c) 
To be a professor of English (d) 
Literary Editor of Mirror, 1, 2, 

3; Dram. Club, 3; Basketball, 

2; Hockey, 1; Volley Ball, 2; 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



SALVATORE MIRABITO 

"Salvy", "Skunk" 
How are they treating ya? (a) 
Playing the slot machines (b) 
Work (c) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Lunch 

Counter, Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 

Honor Roll, 1, 2 (e) 



BURTON W. MORRISON, JR. 

"Sonny" 
Hi Toots! (a) 
Building Models (b) 
Northeastern (c) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Football, 2; 

Hockey, 2 (e) 



MARGARET M. MULREAN 

"Margie", "Mully" 
Hi Toots (a) 
Collecting pins, Globe Contests 

(b) 
W. H. S. Athletic Field on 

Thanksgiving Day, 1936 (c) 
To see Waltham defeat Brockton 

in 1936 (d) 
Commercial Club, Honor Roll, 

Tennis, 2 (e) 

MARY M. MURPHY 
"Red", "Murph" 

What, are ya cra-a-a-zy? (a) 

Collecting Orchestra Leaders' au- 
tographs (b) 

Anywhere I land (c) 

To be able to yell like Cab Cal- 
loway (d) 

Basketbell, 2, 3; Class Team, 2, 
3; Varsity, 2, 3; Baseball, 2, 
3; Class Team Archery, 2, 3; 
Class Team Bowling, 2 ; 
Hockey, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 3; 
Commercial Club, 3 (e) 




ROBERT MILLAR 

"Bob" 
Ask him he knows (a) 
Bicycling, Skiing (b) 
M. I. T. (c) 

B. S. Degree from M. I. T. (d) 
Studying, 1, 2, 3; Mirror room 

Agent, 3 ; Dramatic Club, 3 ; 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



CATHERINE MOBILIA 
"Cattie" 

Oh go wan! (a) 

Military Drilling (b) 

Over there (c) 

Entertainment Committee in Com- 
mercial Club (e) 



MARGARET MUELLER 
"Peg" 

Oh, I'm awfully sorry (a) 

Chewing gum, Walking, Read- 
ing (b) 

Teachers' College (c) 

To be successful (d) 

Dramatic Club, Bowling, 3 (e) 



RICHARD GRIGGS MUNROE 

"Mooner", "Vroi" 
Keep over on your own side 

Fink! No soap! (a) 
Ahem! Nuf Sed (b) 
Northeastern (c) 
To be master of science (d) 
Basketball, 1 ; Sr. Dance Com.. 

3 (e) 



PETER G NEARHOS 

"Pete", "P. G." 
Go 'way, go 'way (a) 
Pushing the middle valve down 

(b) 
P. G (c) 
To have my own orchestra and 

hit all the high spots (d) 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 1, 2, 

3 ; Dramatic Club, 3 ; Radio 

Broadcasts, 3 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROE, 1936 



RUDOLPH NERSESIAN 

"Rudy", "Villa" 
Ain't it? (a) 
Snapping knuckles in Democracy 

(b) 

Work (c) 

To master a cross word puzzle 
(d) 

Baseball and Football, 1; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3; Assembly Com. 
of Commercial' Club, 3; Cafe- 
teria, 3(e) 



MARJORIE E. NOONAN 

"Marge" 
What's the story? (a) 
Dancing, Sewing (b) 
College (c) 

To get to school on time (d) 
Basketball, 2, 3; Orchestra, 1; 

Hockey, 1; Baseball, 1 (e) 



BRENDAN C. O'NEILL 
"Mudscows" 

What do I care? (a) 

Pool, Cards (b) 

Leavenworth (c) 

To sell Mr. Mitchell the Brook- 
lyn Bridge (d) 



SEBASTIAN ORIFICE 

"Orrie" 
Hey Woodie got your home 

work? (a) 
Non-stop flight around the world 

(c) 
To get a job working from 12 to 
1 o'clock, with one hour for 

lunch (d) 
Basketball (e) 



RHODA B. PAUL 

"Roady" 
You should talk (a) 
Singing (b) 

To spend 2 months in Europe (c) 
To be a Superintendent of a 

Hospital (d) 
Cafe, 3 (e) 





OSCAR M. NICHOLS 

"Oss", "Ozzie" 
That's what you think (a) 
Cartooning (b) 
The Professional world (c) 
To be a cartoonist (d) 
Art Editor of the Mirror (e) 



SHIRLEY NORMAN 

"Maxie", "Mrs. Pampinilli" 

These are the times that try men's 
souls (a) 

Being in plays; interior decorat- 
ing, Scrapbooks (b) 

Framingham State Teachers' Col- 
lege (c) 

To be a radio actress (d) 

Dramatic Club Play, Honor Roli, 
1, 3; Sr. Play, Mirror Staff, 
Two Dramatic Club Radio 
Broadcasts, Writer of Class 
Will (e) 

EVELYN F. ORLEANS 

"Evie", "Toots" 
Do ya, Toots? Where's Sonny? 

(a) 
Knitting, Drawing, Sports (b) 
A rose covered bungalow (c) 
To be the best house wife in 

Waltham (d) 
Hockey Class Team and Varsity, 

1, 2, 3 ; Basketball Class Team, 

2, 3; Varsity Squad, Baseball, 
1, 2, 3; Volley Ball, 2, 3; Art 
Club (e) 

ROLAND P. OSTRAND 
"Rollie" 

Oh Min! — Quiet Please (a) 

Thinking up excuses, Playing 
golf (b) 

Wherever she goes (c) 

To get a job selling refrigerators 
to Eskimos (d) 

Golf, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, Com- 
mercial Club, Entertainment 
Committee (e) 



FLORA RITA PEREIRA 

"Perry", "Flora", "Dora", 
"Flo" 

Fooey, So What? (a) 

Sports, Music, Collecting pins, 
Socking everybody (b) 

Simmons College (c) 

Mary a millionaire and see the 
world (d) 

Commercial Club, Bowling, Base- 
bell (e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1936 



NEIL PERRY 
Skip it (a) 

Collecting Stamps and Photo- 
graphs (b) 
Sing Sing (d) 
Commercial Club (e) 



ALBERT J. PHILLIPS 



HELEN F. POLECHIO 
"Kel" 

Oh my Lord! (a) 

Movie scrapbooks, menus and 
cream pitchers (b) 

Wilfred Academy (c) 

To own a beauty parlor in Holly- 
wood (d) 



MARY L. POTTLE 

"Ma-me" 
Not really? (a) 

Collecting pictures of stars (b) 
Secretary (c) 
Member of Commercial Club (e) 



LEROY H. POWERS 

"Roy", "Powerize", "LeFly" 
Why? You think so? What are 

you going to do about it? (a) 
To hear a certain English teacher 

say "Good Work" (b) 
Golf Pro (c) 
Baseball, 1, 2; Basketball, Golf, 

Tennis (e) 




HELEN M. PETROWSKY 

"Pet" 
That will be the week (a) 
Reading, Knitting, Tennis (b) 
New York — School of Child Care 

(c) 
Dramatic Club Play, Sr. Play, 
Sec.-Treas. of Reading Club, 
Executive Com. of Dram. Club, 
Dram. Club Play Com., Soph. 
Social Com. (e) 



ANN ELLERY PINKHAM 
"Pinky" 

How in blazes . . . . ? (a) 

Going to free lectures and walk- 
ing in the rain with "Del" (b) 

Simmons College (c) 

To make the world happy (d) 

Dramatic Club (e) 



FIORI R. PORRETTI 



FRANCIS JAMES POWERS 

"Fran", "Jake" 
That's it (a) 
Sleeping (b) 
'Way Down South (c) 
Yes (d) 



MARY RITA POWERS 

"Ree" 
Wait a minute (a) 
Tennis (b) 
Unknown (c) 
To Travel (d) 
Commercial Club (e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, {e) Activities 



THE IIREOE, 1936 



ROBERT W. POWER 

"Bob" 
Don't ask me, I'm only a Senior 

(a) 
Smotcrax (b) 

Nobody's business school (c) 
To be every other inch a gentle- 
man (d) 
Mirror, 1, 2, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 

2, 3; Dramatic Club, 2, 3; 

Dram. Club Executive Com., 3 ; 

Stage Mgr. Dram. Club Play, 

3; Sr. Play Com. (e) 



LILLIAN PROPHET 

"Lil" 
None (a) 

Collecting souvenirs (b) 
Writer (c) 



JEANNETTE QUIGLEY 

"Quiggy" 

Honest? (a) 

Knitting (b) 

You guess (c) 

To join Company F. with Thel- 
ma and Hazel (d) 

Social Com., 1 ; Field Hockey, 
Class and Varsity Team, 2, 3; 
Capt. of the Class Hockey 
Team, 2; Bowling, 1, 2; Arch- 
ery, 2 (e) 



JOHN A. REGAN 

"Al" 
Get smart (a) 
Wrecking automobiles (b) 
To the Avenue (c) 
To fix automobiles (d) 
Basketball, A-l (e) 



HORTON C. REYNOLDS 

"Ducky" 
Chewing the rag (a) 
Baseball (b) 
Any bar room (c) 
To sell a suit of clothes 

Gandhi (d) 



to 




I *&* 




HERBERT A. PRIDHAM 

"Speed" 
Don't let it worry you (a) 
Bike riding, Stamp collecting, the 

Trumpet (b) 
Anywhere to get work (c) 
Get homework done on time (d) 
Senior Band, 3 (e) 



ADELAIDE E. QUIGLEY 

"Ad", "Quiggie" 
Oh, Fuh Goo'ness Sakes. Be 

Normal (a) 
Swimming, Skating, and an Usher 

(b) 
College, then France here I am 

(c) 
A successful French Teacher (d) 
Baseball, 1; Field Hockey, 2, 3; 
Varsity Squad, 2 ; Tennis, 2 ; 
Archery, 2, 3; Bowling, 3; 
Dramatic Club, 3; Dram. Club 
Dance Com., 2 ; Hockey Var- 
sity and Class Team, 3 (e) 



BERTHA ELENORA READ 

"Minnie", "Bert", "Red" 
Hi ya Mazie (a) 
Working in Jean's Lunch (b) 
Europe (c) 
To see Vantine get the picture 

contract (d) 
Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 2, 3; 

Volley Ball, 1, 2; Baseball, 1, 

2, 3 (e) 



MIA REINAP 

"Mya" 
Ye Gods and little gold fish! (a) 
Reading (b) 

Massachusetts State College (c) 
To travel around the world (d) 



PAUL C. RICHARD 

"Meadows" 
None of your lip (a) 
Cutting paper dolls (b) 
Weston Golf Club "Pro' 
Golf (e) 



(c) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIEROE, 1936 



PHILLIP I. RHODES 

"Phil" 
Hey, Homely (a) 
Maurer (b) 
The Corner (c) 
To pop Reilly (d) 



ROBERT B. RISEBERG 

"Bob" 
I'm telling you (a) 
Music, Reading (b) 
Tufts College (c) 
To own a chain of clothing 

Stores (d) 
Band, 2, 3; Track Team, 2, 3; 

Dramatic Club, 3 ; Basketball, 

1, 2, 3 (e) 



PETER SALVUCCI, JR. 

"Pete", "Sal" 
You said it, my friend (a) 
Hunting (for A's and B's) (b) 
Harvard? ? ? (c) 
To be a contractor with Cataldo 

as the Governor of the State 

(d) 
Dramatic Club, Sports Reporter 

for the Mirror, WNAC Radio 

Plays, 3 ; Stage Mgr. in Senior 

Play (e) 

EFFIE MARIE SCHOFIELD 
"Ef" 

Gosh (a) 

Sports and Sewing (b) 

To Success (c) 

To go traveling (d) 

Chairman of Membership Com. 
of Commercial Club, Girls 
Sports Editor, Honor Roll, 1, 
2, 3; Hockey Class and Varsity 
Teams, 1, 2, 3; Basketball 
Class and Varsity Teams, 2, 3 
Volley Ball Class Team, 2 
Baseball Class Team, 1, 2 
Bowling, 1, 2, 3; Tennis, Arch 
ery, 2, 3 (e) 



DORIS SEABURG 

"Dodo" 
'Tain't funny (a) 
Collecting picture stars (b) 
Importer or Aviatrix (c) 
To be a famous person (d) 
Member of Commercial Club, 

Honor Roll, 3; (e) 




JOHN L. RHODES 

"Johnny" 
Oh, Heck — Abbysinia (a) 
1 Brunette — Motors (b) 
Army Air Corp (c) 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 2 (e) 



BETTY ROSS 

"Honey", "Hon", "Bet", 
"Gypsy" 
That's what you think (a) 
Being a good sport (b) 
Far away from someone (c) 
To see Lillian Thurston come to 

school with her own homework 

done (d) 
Basketball, 2, 3; Class Team, 2. 

3; Varsity, 2; Archery, 2, 3; 

Class Team, 2 ; Volley Ball, 2 ; 

Commercial Club, 3 (e) 



BORDEN F. SCHOFIELD 

"Sco" 

Uno (a) 

To meet Joe Louis in the dark 
(b) 

To go to W. P. A. (University) 
(c) 

To meet Mr. Hodge in a two 
round fight (d) 

Football, 1 ; Hockey, 1 ; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2; Band, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



JEAN C. SCHAUFUS 

"Schau", "Cubie" 
Don't look now, but what are 

you? (a) 
Fighting with Jaybie (Je«n to 

you) (b) 
England (c) 
To have a glorious career — whee ! 

(d) 

Dramatic Club, 1, 2; Vice Pres. 

of Art Club, 3 (e) 



WILLIAM SELIG 

"Blondie", "Rilly" 
How ya bin? (a) 
Annoying teachers (b) 
All over U. S. (c) 
To be a comedian (d) 
Student Mgr. of Track Team (e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIR ROE, 1936 



HAROLD NATHAN SHAPIRO 

"Harry", "Shappy" 
You wouldn't understand — It's in 

Jewish (a) 
Business, Pleasure, Business (b) 
B. U. (c) 
Baseball (e) 



AUDREY SMART 
"Aud" 

That'll be the gallant day (a) 

Looking for Emma in the corri- 
dor (b) 

England (in a fog) (c) 

To see Mr. become a pro- 
fessional (d) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Hon. Mem- 
ber Commercial Club, 2 ; Com- 
mercial Club, 3; Field Hockey, 
1, 2, 3; Class Team, 1, 2; 
Basketball, 2, 3 ; Class Team, 
2; Bowling 1, 2, 3; Class 
Team, 1 ; Volley Ball, 2 ; Base- 
ball, 2 (e) 



RACHEL STIMPSON 

"Ray" 
Gee Whiz! (a) 
Knitting (b) 
Stenographer (c) 
Member of Commercial Club (e) 



ANN HELEN STRAGGAS 

"Tessie" 
It's unbelievable — But? (a) 
Writing notes to Kate (b) 
Anyplace, anywhere, anytime (c) 
To enjoy life (d) 
Girls' Hockey, Girls' Bowling, 
Volley Ball, Baseball Class 
Team, Gym Meet, Basketball, 
2 ; Baseball Team, Bowling, 
Archery, 3 ; Basketball, Mem- 
ber of Reading Club, Bowling, 
Hockey (e) 



WILLIAM TAMULEWICZ 

"Vinncy", "Cocoanut" 
Pooey to me from you (a) 
Card Playing, Stamp Collecting 

(b) 
Own largest milk plant (c) 
Commercial Club, Honor Roll 

(e) 





WENDELL SLAYTON 

That's what I say, who cares? (a) 

Fishing and nautical scrapbooks 

(b) 
Massachusetts Nautical (c) 
To pilot the Queen Mary (d) 
Band, Basketball (e) 




THELMA SMITH 

"Thel" 
What shall we do? (a) 
Books (b) 

Anywhere with "Gee" (c) 
To join Company F. with Jean- 

nette and Hazel (d) 




NORMAN STINEHOUR 

"Norm" 
Oh ! For goodness sakes ! What's 

the Story? (a) 
Collecting old coins and stamps 

(b) 
Place unknown (c) 
Hockey, Baseball, Commercial 

Club (e) 



LEE STRICKLAND 

"Strick", "Doc" 
Don't worry about it. You know 

(a) 
Chiseling (?) (b) 
I'll bite? (c) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Football, 2, 

3 (e) 



ELIZABETH J. TARANTO 
"Liz" 

J-e-e-e-kus (a) 

Eating cocoanut (b) 

Hawaii (c) 

To try to lose Frances (d) 

Bowling, 2 ; Basketball, 1 ; Base- 
ball, 1; Field Hockey, 2, 3; 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Commer- 
cial Club, 2, 3 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIKEOK, 1936 



AVIS TEELE 
"Ave" 

Don't let anybody tell you differ- 
ent (a) 

Snapshots (b) 

Wilfred Academy (c) 

To scalp Indians (d) 

Sports, Commercial Club (e) 



DOROTHY E. THORNE 
"Dot" 

How ya doin' (a) 

Riding, Swimming (b) 

Boston University (c) 

Marry a millionaire (d) 

Baseball, 2; Cafeteria, Commer- 
cial Club (e) 



LILLIAN MAE THURSTON 
"Lil", "Lily", "Thirsty" 

Let's take your home work (a) 

Wearing Gay's clothes (b) 

Lakeview (c) 

To see Betty Ross come to school 
with her home work done (d) 

Basketball, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 
3; Volley Ball, 2, 3; Archery, 
2, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 3; Com- 
mercial Club (e) 



LLOYD M. TREFETHEN 
"Tref" 

Wait a second (a) 

Amateur Radio (b) 

Webb Institute (c) 

Invent a working Perpetual Mo- 
tion Machine (d) 

Football, 1, 3; President of Radio 
Club, Leading part Dramatic 
Club Play; Cast Senior Play; 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 
1; Dramatic Club; Radio 
Broadcasts (e) 

DOROTHY WALKER TRUE 
"Dot" 

You know something (a) 

Athletics (b) 

Posse School of Physical Educa- 
tion (c) 

To teach in Waltham High 

Hockey Class Team, 1, 2, 3; Var- 
sity, 2, 3; Mgr. and Capt. Bas- 
ketball Class Team, 2, 3; Var- 
sity, 2; Mgr., 3; Volley Ball 
Class Team, 2; Baseball Class 
Team, 1, 2; Class Social Com- 
mittee, 1 (e) 




4l *■*■ M llHHfekiiMfc/ 




ALBERT THORNE 

"Bert" 
How to go (a) 
Cutting paper dolls (b) 
Sing Sing (c) 
Football, Baseball, Hockey (e) 



GRACE LOUISE THURSTON 

"Gay", "Grade" 
Don't run no one saw you take 

it (a) 
Getting Lillian up at 6:30 (b) 
Pine Hill Circle — Lakeview (c) 
To get Florence McKeon to go 

hiking with me (d) 
Basketball, 2, 3; Volley Ball, 2; 

Archery, 2; Commercial Club, 

Honor Roll, Baseball, 1, 2, 3; 

Class Team (e) 



JUNE TINGLOF 
"Ting", "Tingy" 

I don't know (a) 

Automobiling (b) 

(Immediate) N. Hampshire (c) 

Literary Editor, Mirror, 2; Alum- 
ni Editor, Mirror, 3; Honor 
Roll, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2; 
Bowling, 1, 2, 3; Volley Ball, 
2, 3; Tennis, 2, 3; Baseball, 
1, 2, 3 (e) 



KENNETH E. TROMBLEY 

Don't be crazy. What are you 
doing tomorrow night? (a) 

Baseball, Football, getting Ses- 
sions (b) 

Belmont (c) 

Football, 2; Baseball (e) 



WILLIAM ALFRED TRUE 
"Bill" 

Don't you think so? (a) 

Radio (b) 

Time will tell (c) 

Chief radio engineer at WLW 

(d) 
Radio Club, 3 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIREOK, 1936 



PHYLLIS M. UHLIN 

"Phil", "Swede" 
Wait a year — (a) 
Saving pennies (b) 
European Countries (c) 
You guess? ? (d) 
Basketball, Bowling, Hockey, 

Volley Ball, Commercial Club, 

Honor Roll (e) 



FRED R. VILES 
"Freddie" 

Well? ! (a) 

Horticulture, Miniature Railroad- 
ing (b) 

Mass. State, Amherst (c) 



DANIEL G. WAICKWICZ 

"Danny" 
Yeah! Yeah! — Rack 'em up. 

(a) 
Swimming, Pool, Necking (b) 
Olympic games of 1940 — Swim- 
ming (c) 
To get a "C" in Democracy (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1; 
Football, 3; Commercial Club 
Vice Pres., 3; Honor Roll, 1; 
Track, 3 ; Entertainment Com. 
of Commercial Club, 3; Jr. 
Marshal Sr. Class Day, 2 (e) 



IRVING R. WELLMAN 
"Ike", "Welly" 

Mind your own business! (a) 

Fixing bicycles, eating and sleep- 
ing (b) 

Sports (e) 

Forestry, Traveling (c) 

Famous (d) 

CLYDE E. WILBER 

Call me anything, but early in 
the morning 
Take it Easy — Don't be Afraid 

(a) 
Homework (b) 
Boston University (c) 
To be president of the United 

States (d) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 2 

Pres. of Commercial Club, 3 

Chrm. of Picture Com., 3 , 

Property Man and Sec. of Sr. 

Play Com., 3; Track 2e) 




ESTHER J. VENINI 

"Es" 
Leva mind (a) 
Travel (b) 
All points West (c) 
See Murph's "Red" hair turn 

brown (d) 
Hockey, 1, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 

3; Bowling, 1, 2, 3; Volley 

Ball, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; 

Class Team, 1, 2; Commercial 

Club, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 

(e) 



BARBARA VITTUM 
"Toosie" 

Go jump in the lake! No kid- 
din' (a) 

Collecting Dog Pins (b) 

Wilfred Academy 

To succeed in whatever I do. To 
get one on Mr. Ward, (d) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; North Jr. 
Alumnae Com., 1, 2, 3; Bas- 
ketball, Baseball, Lunch Coun- 
ter, 3 ; Candy Girl, Sr. Play, 
3; Red Cross Agent 3 (e) 



HELEN MARIE WALZ 

"Walzie" 
Oh Yeah Huh? (a) 
Dancing, Skating, Drawing (b) 
Heaven (c) 
To be a private secretary to a 

young employer (d) 
Commercial Club, Tennis (e) 



PAULINE WESTON 
"Polly" 

Am I late? (a) 

Collecting China dogs (b) 

Tomlin Street (c) 

To meet St. Peter (d) 

Red Cross Com., 2 ; Sr. Play 
Com., 3 ; Bowling, 2 ; Class 
Day Com., Dramatic Club (e) 



MARTHA ANN WILSON 

"Mardy" 
Laugh, I thought I'd die, no 

kidding (a) 
Kidding myself that I'll get a 

car next year (b) 
Eventually, Mass. Gen. Hospital 

(c) 
To graduate from M. G. H. with 

an R. N. (d) 
Bowling, Hockey, 2 ; Archery, 3 ; 

Dramatic Club, 2 ; Dramatic 

Club Dance Com., 2 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (<?) Activities 



THE MIREOE, 1936 



DONALD W. WOODALL 

"Don", "Smilie", "Woody" 
Keep Cheerful! (a) 
Sports (b) 

Waverley Institute (c) 
To be mayor of Waltham (d) 
Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 2, 3; 
Football, 3 ; Chrm. Sr. Dance, 
Jr. Prom Com., Auditor Sr. 
Class, Capt Hockey Team, 3 
(e) 



EMMA WOODSIDE 

"Em", "Woodie" 
Don't mind me! (a) 
Driving and carrying books (b) 
The world's cross-roads (c) 
To fly farther and faster than 

A. E. (d) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic 
Club, 2, 3; Commercial Club, 
3 ; Chrm. Entertainment Com., 
Commercial Club, 3 (e) 



MARY CARASTIA 

"Mae" 
Thank youse (a) 
Sewing (b) 
Europe (c) 
To see Anna Luke marry that 

millionaire (d) 
Honor Roll, 1,2, 3 ; Commercial 

Club, 2, 3; Archery, 2, 3; 

Bowling, 3 (e) 







4^ 








MARY GUEST WOODALL 

"May" 
How d' go — Yoo Stop It Now ! 

(a) 
Knitting, Dancing, Cooking, 

Keeping a Scrap-book (b) 
Simmons School of Nursing (c) 
To be a famous nurse (d) 
Candy Girl Dramatic Club Play, 

3; Candy Girl Sr. Play, 3; 

Sr. Dance Com., 3; Dramatic 

Club, 3 ; Hockey, 3 ; Basketball, 

1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 3 (e) 



ANTHONY J. ZANCO 
"Tony" 

Wusty (a) 

Playing my Accordion, Baseball 
(b) 

Major Bowes (c) 

To become a professional Accor- 
dion player (d) 

Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1; Mu- 
sic, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



ESTHER HANSEN 






Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1936 



HELENA BARRY 

"Red" 
Collecting of the Record (b) 
To be the tap on Fred Astaire's 

shoes (d) 



JOSEPH BONICA 

"Buck", "Bugs" 
What do you mean you lost your 

dog! (a) 
Baseball, Basketball (b) 
Still unknown (c) 
A tour through Spain and South 

American Countries (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 

Baseball, 1 (e) 



ALBERT CARAMANICA 

"Mike", "Al", "Slugger" 

Say, Your all right! (a) 

Hunting, Swimming, and Mary 
(b) 

Hunting lions in Africa (c) 

Student Council, 1, 2, 3; Chrm. 
Dance Com., 3; Kelly Press- 
man of Mirror, 2, 3 (e) 



WILLIAM CRAWFORD 

"Bill- 
Think it over now (a) 
Skating, Golf, Walking (b) 
Who knows? (c) 
Football, 1, 2; Baseball 1 (e) 



PAUL DELOREY 

"Digs", "Sleepy" 
My Boy You're Wrong (a) 
Sleep (b) 

Work on W. P. A. (c) 
Sleep on a feathered bed (d) 
Hook the periods I can't sleep in 

(e) 



RICHARD J. KELLY 

"Dick", "Slush" 
I Don't Know, Who is She? (a) 
Golf (b) 
Unknown (c) 

To be a Golf Professional (d) 
Golf, 3; Hockey, 3; Basketball 

(e) 



JOSEPHINE LORE 
"Jo", "Little Giant" 

Oh, I forgot (a) 

Walking in the rain, Clothes (b) 

I'll let you know when I get 
there (c) 

To grow tall (d) 

Basketball, Baseball, Field Hock- 
ey, Archery (e) 



MARGARET McNAMARA 
"Mardi" 

I'm hungary (a) 

I'm hungry (a) 

Amateur theatricals (b) 

Tahiti (c) 

Mrs. J. F. P. (d) 

Member of Dram. Play, Dram. 
Club's Play, 3; "Ryerson Mys- 
tery", 3; "Torch Bearers", 3; 
Broadcast, Pres. Literary Club, 
3 (e) 



M. JEAN PEELING 
"Jeannie", "Dinny" 
Wa-it a minute! I get so teary! 

(a) 
Walking in rain. Teasing Dotty 

(b) 
West Point (c) 
To be a famous dress designer 

(d) 
Volley Ball, 2; Archery, 2, 3; 

Basketball, 3; Picture money, 

2, 3 (e) 



MARY QUINN 

"Quinnie" 
Not really? Don't you like it? 

(a) 
Horseback riding (b) 
Africa (c) 
To see Marge come to school 

once in a while (d) 
Basketball, Archery, Soccer (e) 



ALLISON RINGROSE 

"Ringy" 
Keep still (a) 

Skiing, Tennis, Tobboganing (b) 
Mass. General Hospital (c) 
Be a child specialist (d) 
Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1 (e) 



ADELE SANGERMANO 

"Del" 
Really (a) 
Reading (b) 
Secretary (c) 

A trip around the world (d) 
Baseball (e) 



HARRY E. SHUBLEY 

"Ed", "Shuby" 
That's what you think (a) 
Baseball, Driving (b) 
Baseball School (c) 
To learn to fly an airplane and 

to become a pilot (d) 
Baseball, 2, 3 (e) 



LYMAN SINCLAIR 

"Tarzan" 
Don't ever do that (a) 
Sports (b) 
Heaven (c) 
A job with a month's vacation 

with pay (d) 



WALTER N. SMITH 

"Peg Leg" 
Is that so? (a) 
Music (b) 
Country Beyond (c) 
To get back to Florida (d) 



JOHN J. WALSH 

"Smokey" 
Say Please (a) 

Stealing lunches at recess (b) 
California or bust (c) 
To be a success (d) 
Swimming (e) 



ROBERT M. WHEELER 

"Bob", "Flash" 
You're Bugs — Hey Tramp — 

Who Said So? (a) 
Track and all other sports (b) 
Northeastern University (c) 
To go to Northeastern University 

Baseball, 1; Track, 1, 2, 3; Bas- 
ketball (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (<?) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1936 



Class History 



The Class of 1936 is the last of those few 
oddities of Waltham High — the classes that were 
born one half at a time. That is, the Class of '36 
is the last class that was started with half its future 
self at Waltham High School itself, and the other 
half elsewhere. The first half began life as a body 
of hopelessly overpowered little strangers — hu- 
man, perhaps, but no one seemed to care. At the 
end of the year they were informed that in the 
fall they were to become twice as big and twice 
as good, because the other half was to be joined 
to them, and finally they were told that they 
should be known as "Sophomores," and that as 
a special reward for incipient virtue they were to 
be allowed to go to school all alone — in the 
afternoon, after some mysterious grown-ups who 
haunted the building in the morning had gone 
back home to bed. 

Around Thanksgiving time we learned that it 
was proper for all good little Sophomores to elect 
class officers. This we did. In case anyone is 
curious, the result follows: President, Edward 
McCabe; Vice-president, Alfred Gledhill; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, John Maguire; Auditor, John 
Clavin. Later, plans were made for a Valentine 
Social, to be held in the middle of February, but 
unfortunately it became very cold as the day of 
the social approached, so it was postponed and 
finally held about St. Patrick's Day, with a large 
number of the class present. Surprisingly, the af- 
fair was a success; so much of a success, in fact, 
that a second social was held in May, which was 
just as great a success. Already the Class was 
beginning to show signs of a much more prosper- 
ous future than that of some of its predecessors. 
A short time after our spring social, we were told 
that we should soon be Juniors, and that the pur- 
chase of an alarm clock was in order. 

Not until the middle of October did the Junior 
Class begin to get over its affliction of sleep walk- 
ing in school. A month or two later, after a 
return to something like normalcy, Edward 
McCabe was reelected President, Lawrence Ben- 
nett became Vice-president, Marjorie Furbush took 



her pen in hand on being chosen Secretary-Treas- 
urer, and Auditor Woodrow Cataldo was given the 
job of keeping an eye on the affairs of the Class. 
Sometime in January we held another social. 
Then after the February vacation, everyone tried 
to do his best to labor under the difficulties of 
intermittent impositions of construction machinery. 

After Easter, the Class chose its colors, green 
and silver; its motto, "Laborate et Vincite — 
Work and Win" ; and the chairman of the Junior 
Prom committee, Alfred Gledhill. The Prom, 
which was most favorable, was held at Nutting's 
on the evening of May 31. After the Seniors had 
been turned loose upon the cold, hard world, the 
Juniors had the building to themselves for a while. 
In the meantime, the builders had been making 
more and more stabs at the old building, and 
finally the school was closed on June 14, an 
earlier closing than usual. 

After a full three months' vacation, the school 
was partly reopened, the new west wing and the 
rejuvenated main building being used for classes 
on the old two-session plan until the completion 
of the new east wing. On Wednesday, September 
18, the Seniors returned to their studies. Every- 
one spoke with amazement to everyone else about 
the startling changes. Part of the amazement was 
genuine, but the rest was just put on. You see, 
nearly everyone had sneaked back during the sum- 
mer to see how the construction was getting along, 
but no one wanted his friends to know that he 
would display such an interest in school as to go 
back there when he didn't have to. It took some 
time for the students to accustom themselves to 
the many changes. The Seniors, for the most 
part, tried to assume an air of instantaneous un- 
derstanding of their surroundings, but everyone 
knew he didn't know everything until he stopped 
saying such things as, "Yes, they call it Room 109, 
but it's really the old Room 7." 

The football season was one of the most suc- 
cessful in several years. The team lost only one 
game and tied for another, and was scored upon 
only twice. Our school and Maiden High were 



THE MIRE 

declared co-champions; consequently, each school 
holds the trophy in recognition of its feats for 
one half of this year. Carlyle says that history is 
the biography of great men, which saying brings 
to mind our Barney, the courageous captain who 
won for us the possession of the trophy for the 
first half-year by his winning coin toss. 

On Monday, December 2, the new east wing 
and the cafeteria were opened. The Sophomores 
joined the Juniors and Seniors in the morning, 
all going on the one session, and the school day 
was made an hour longer. On Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 3, two local drug stores were reported sold 
out of corn plasters and other foot remedies. On 
Wednesday, December 4, there was another of the 
mixups like those on the previous days caused by 
all the bells being rung at the lunch periods. On 
this day, also a seventh period was added to the 
usual six for the purpose of promoting club and 
other activities, and for make-up work and special 
help from teachers. This innovation has given 
the students many opportunities impossible under 
the old two-session plan. 

Before Christmas, the final group of class of- 
ficers was elected; namely, Edward McCabe, Pres- 
ident, by force of habit, perhaps ; Dorothy Barrett, 
elected on the two-minds-with-but-a-single-thought 
principle, perhaps; Marjory Furbush, Secretary- 
Treasurer, another hangover from the previous 
year; and Donald Woodall, Auditor, just to make 
his supervision of the Secretary official, perhaps. 
All in all, as nice a little family group as has 
been seen for many a day. 

Shortly before the Christmas vacation, the an- 
nual Senior Dance was held at Nutting's. For this 
affair, Donald Woodall was elected chairman. 



OR, 1936 

The victories of our undefeated hockey team 
kept the school excited during the winter. At the 
end of the season, under the leadership of Cap- 
tain Donald Woodall, the team won the champion- 
ship of the Bay State League. 

On Friday, March 27, the Senior Class pre- 
sented The Torchbearers, an uproarious comedy by 
George Kelley. The performance was of almost 
professional quality. Edith H. Rand of the 
faculty directed the play, and John Eaton was 
chairman of the committee. 

Before the February vacation, the Seniors elect- 
ed Clyde Wilbur chairman of the committee for 
class pictures. About a month later, the results of 
the bidding of certain photographers were dis- 
played for the approval of the Class. Outstanding 
were the portraits of that contemplative cherub, 
Mr. Gaziano, and that curly-headed angel-puss, 
Eddie McCabe. 

The editions of the Mirror this year were in 
keeping with the spirit of newness pervading the 
building. The magazine was a credit to the Class 
and was convincing proof of the high standing of 
Waltham High in school journalism. 

Our Class is proud of the fact that our principal, 
Mr. Arthur N. Burke, who is retiring, will be an 
honorary graduate of the Class of '36. This 
unique honor was won through no effort of ours, 
but we are pleased, nevertheless, that the Class 
should be thus distinguished. 

And now, as the Class of 1936 approaches the 
day when the city formally ceases to care for it any 
longer, it is not improper that it should feel a little 
pride in the fact that it gained for itself, in 
recognition of a successful and happy existence, 
*he title of "The Perfect Thirty-six." 

Robert Power. 



THE IIEEOR, 1936 



Last Will and Testament of The Class of 1936 



To Whom It May Concern: 

Be it remembered that we, the class of 1936 of 
the Waltham Senior High School, being, through 
no fault of our own, incredulously sound of mind, 
and having full possession of our faculties in spite 
of the fact that actions speak louder than words, 
make this attempt to express our sincere apprecia- 
tion to those whose patience, efforts, and faithful- 
ness never waned, especially during those crucial 
periods when our craniums seemed completely 
enshrouded by ominous clouds, and do hereby be- 
queathe and dispose of our treasured possessions 
as follows: 

To the class of 1937 we leave such mementos 
as delicately handcarved names which conspicuous- 
i ly decorate desk covers, wads of deliciously flavored 
gum rudely concealed beneath many a chair, and 
last but not least, our uncanny ability to make all 
social functions a financial success. 

To the class of 1938 we bequeathe our intel- 
lectual powers with which to absorb the profound 
wisdom of our erudite faculty. Also we bequeathe 
to them the pleasant thought of some day reach- 
ing the lofty peak of Seniordom. 

We leave to our beloved headmaster, Mr. 
Arthur N. Burke, fond recollections of a host of 
friends, both young and old; visions of many 
former incidents; some trying, others amusing, 
and memories of noteworthy occasions with which 
he was associated during his regime at Waltham 
High. In order that he may always be informed 
about the future existence of our alma mater, we 
leave him a life subscription to our school maga- 
zine, the Mirror. 

To Mr. Goodrich we leave the weighty respon- 
sibilities of fulfilling the duties of foster father 
and of safely guiding Waltham High through the 
course of years to come. 

To Mr. Ward we leave the pleasure of succeed- 
ing to the Sub-master office with the ruling, how- 
ever, that in order to uphold the dignity of this 
honorable position, he must promise to refrain 



from mentioning any facts or anecdotes concern- 
ing that enticing female, Mae West. 

To Miss Woodward, beneficent friend of the 
unemployed, we bequeathe numerous occupations 
for the purpose of aiding those students and grad- 
uates whom she deems most capable and efficient. 

Our heartfelt thanks we give to Miss Hoffman 
for her practical philosophies of life, and to her 
future classes we leave a leather bound book en- 
titled "Tales of Travel", so that they may read the 
many interesting stories of her European trips. 

To Mr. Hood we leave a sum of money for the 
establishment of a radio studio in which to con- 
duct amateur radio contests to be sponsored by 
Waltham High. 

To Mr. Sheehy we leave an everlasting store of 
rulers suspended from chains which will be at- 
tached to the side of each desk, This, we hope, 
will eliminate the humiliation of his asking vari- 
ous pupils this embarrassing question: "Please, 
may I — ah, ahem, may I borrow my ruler for a 
few minutes?" 

To Miss Darmedy we bequeathe an endless 
supply of brilliantly hued yarns so that she may 
add to her wardrobe those chic knitted clothes for 
which she is known. 

To Mr. Leary we leave the new gymnasium and 
all its equipment so that he may train and de- 
velop such promising lads as KroL Zeno, and 
Kaveleski to be the football stars of '37 who will 
help the team to beat Brockton. 

In order that Miss Scrottron may never forget 
the capers of the class of '36, we bequeathe to her 
a volume of memories. We trust that this volume 
will help her to remember some of our better 
characteristics too. 

To the portly gentleman in Room 115, we leave 
a collection of illustrations with which to make 
clear the perplexing problems of democracy and 
to afford him the privilege and pleasure of recit- 
ing till the sound of the first bell. 



THE MIKKOR, 193C 



To Mr. Reynolds we leave one algebra class 
comprised entirely of girls who will receive dur- 
ing the whole year no mark higher nor lower 
than A. 

We hereby nominate and appoint as co-execu- 
tors Mr. Lees, Miss Cyr, and Miss Mooney, who 
shall carry out the provisions of this, our last 
will and testament. 



In witness whereof, we have hereunto set our 
hartd and affixed our seal this tenth day of June, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred 
and thirty-six. God save the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts ! 

We, the class of '36, do make this codicil to 
our will and hereby appoint Miss Margaret 
MacNamara, who shall present the gifts to those 
who have been decreed worthy of such honors. 

Shirley Norman. 



Who's Who in the Class of 1936 



Most Popular Boy 

Most Popular Girl 

Best Looking Boy 

Best Looking Girl 

Most Studious Boy 

Most Studious Girl 

Best Actor 

Best Actress 

Most Cheerful Boy 

Most Cheerful Girl 

Best Dressed Boy 

Best Dressed Girl 

Class Bad Man 

Class Baby 

Most Athletic Boy 

Most Athletic Girl 

Brightest Social Light 

Class Clown 

Boy Most Likely to Succeed 

Girl Most Likely to Succeed 



Edward McCabe 

Dorothy Barrett 

Paul Dinsmore 

Martha Bryden 

John Eaton 

Mia Reinap 

Irving Berman 

Margaret McNamara 

Donald Woodall 

Jean Harrington 

James Bam forth 

Pauline Weston 

Frank Curran 

Edgar Johnson 

Donald Woodall 

Cyrilla Mann 

Marjorie Furbush 

Kenneth Trombley 

Domenic Lupo 

Dorothy Barrett 



THE MIEEOE, 1936 



Class Prophecy 



I rubbed the dirt out of my eyes. I felt some- 
thing rough and dirty on my face. It was a beard, 
matted and filled with dirt. There was a musty 
smell. Something damp and hard was under my 
back. My outstretched hand felt a worm-eaten 
board above me, under me, on all sides of me. 
Gasping for air I struggled to get out. I pushed 
up the cover, forced my way through the cold 
ground and almost hit my head on a tombstone. 

"Well, shut my mouth!" I said with surprise 
as I read it. "Here lies Woodrow Cataldo, who 
died while taking a bath on the thirtieth floor of 
the Empire State Building. He slipped on a cake 
of soap; flew out the window; and landed in a 
garbage truck, where life departed from him. He 
was very much embarrassed." 

Then my eye caught sight of the stone next to 
mine. I glided over to it, and with difficulty made 
out the inscription: 

"In memory of Peter Salvucci, who 
died in battle — in battle with his 
wife, Hepzibah, who crowned him 
with a frying pan." 

"Hey, Pete," I cried, "come out! Wake up!" 
Suddenly a bald head shot up through the green 
grass. It looked at me and said, "Get me a law- 
yer! Get me a lawyer! I want a divorce!" 

"Divorce?" I echoed, "Why the old lady 
croaked over five years ago when your daughter 
socked her with the stove cover!" 

The eyes in the head blinked and the withered 
lips smiled. Then up came two fleshless hands 
and finally a whole skeleton came into sight. 

"Well, Pete," I said, "how does it feel after 
sleeping all these years?" 

"How many years is it?" he asked. At a loss 
to answer, I looked again at the stone. It had 
the date 1945 carved on it. 

"Gosh, I don't know," I answered. "I wonder 
what year it is. At any rate, Pete," I continued, 
"You had a peach of a funeral. The whole city 
was there. Beer was served, and everybody had a 
good time." 



"That's one thing my wife had to pay for," he 
laughed. 

"Yes" — I mused, "and it was the next week 
that I died. Why didn't you let me know before- 
hand, and we could have gone together!" 

"Well, you know how those things are," he 
said, "perhaps Saint Peter could only handle one 
of us at a time." 

"Saint Peter my eye," I retorted, "I know where 
you went!" 

"Let's go haunt our old teachers," I suggested, 
and gleefully we set out. We began to walk 
across the cemetery through the black night. In 
a minute we came to the street, a huge ten lane 
highway. It seemed that a bullet whizzed by 
every minute. 

"Those must be automobiles," Pete ventured to 
guess. 

We glided along, examining the way with great 
curiosity. What year was it? Where were we? 
What had happened since our deaths? Suddenly 
Pete squealed with delight — he had found a news- 
paper. Screaming headlines said: "WORLD 
WAR A FLOP — WOMEN REFUSE TO 
FIGHT." 

"World War," we marveled. "Women fight- 
ing?" Further reading disclosed that it was 1955, 
that the Queen of Hot Dogia had made fun of 
the Princess of Hamburgia's new hat. As a re- 
sult war followed. Furthermore, it was a woman's 
world. Man was at home taking care of the 
children, while the women had taken over all other 
positions. Every Friday night the city council 
met to discuss the new fashions and play bridge — 
But back to the war. 

Two large armies had gathered on the Rhine, 
that of Hot Dogia under the generalship of Mary 
Woodall; that of Hamburgia under Esther Meh- 
ring. General Woodall had made a fierce drive 
which ended up in India. General Mehring, too, 
had made an attack. She advanced steadily for 
days and days. Her every move was carefully 
concealed. She finally found herself in Little 



THE MIRROR, 1936 



America, where she found a cute little Eskimo 
who kept her busy. Of course, the war was all 
off then. 

But it was really because of the dictators that 
war had begun at all. Dictator Shirley Norman 
of Hamburgia had not invited Dictator Kotsifas 
of Hot Dogia to her tea. Therefore, Der Kotsifas 
invited the socialities of Europe to a beer party 
one afternoon and snubbed the passionate dicta- 
tor of Hamburgia. Among the nobility present 
were the tall and stately Lord Benny Evangelista 
and his wife, Blanche McKenny, a firm-voiced, 
robust female. 

Other guests of honor were the greatest living 
wit in the world, Robert Millar; Joseph Malloy, 
Prince of Wales ; George Harris, Prince of Sword- 
fishes; and Bill Gannon, Prince of Clams. The 
German Legation consisted of John Kelly, Walter 
Hagen, and Richard Kelly. Then politics was 
discussed and the fireworks began. Charles Bell, 
the bouncer, slapped Feore Porretti and was thrown 
out the window. His pride was greatly hurt. 
After the battle, Adelade Quigley was found up 
in the chandelier, Joseph Mann under the beer 
barrels, and George Bolton under the carpet. Such 
was the information we found in the newspaper. 

"Boy, how times have changed!" I cried. 

But far more startling than the war was the an- 
nouncement that the achievement of Mr. and Mrs. 
Dionne had been hopelessly obscured by the tri- 
umphs of Parker Berry and John Maguire, the 
proud fathers respectively of the decemplets and 
the duodecemplets. 

We left the newspaper and flew onward. Soon 
the lights of a city came into view. In a second 
we were in it. Huge electric signs stretched hun- 
dreds of feet into the air. Traffic lanes four 
stories high were jammed with cars. A dazzling 
green sign caught our attention. It said: WAL 
THAM ARENA— CHAMPIONSHIP WREST- 
LING MATCH— TONGUE TWISTER BIAN- 
CONI CHALLENGES KNOCK-EM-DEAD 
TINGLOFF. MINOR BOUT BETWEEN DE- 
MON FRANK LANE AND LAWRENCE 
WOODLAND, ALIAS THE PANSY." 

Our time was all too short. Another sign 
blinked out, "BEAL'S THEATRE— COMING 



ATTRACTION— WIFE VERSUS SECRETARY, 
WITH DOROTHY BARRETT, EDWARD 
McCABE, AND BARBARA VITTUM." We 
went in just as the news reel came on. Richard 
Green, Democratic nominee for the presidency, 
was speaking. "If I'm elected," he said, "the men 
will once more wear the pants in this country." 
Tremendous booing came from the 90 per cent 
female audience. Then came a fleeting picture of 
Play Boy Winthrop Andrews, one of the marry- 
ing Andrews. He was reported as engaged to 
Peggy Hopkins Castner. 

Another personality shown in the news was 
Edgar Johnson, world-famed journalist. He ex- 
celled Walter Winchell in that he not only peeped 
through the key hole but even climbed through it. 
Last of all came the news that Ruth Garfink, dar- 
ing young aviatrix, had flown across the Charles 
River in a history-making flight. 

Next came a short Popular Science picture. It 
showed the remarkable achievement of Irving 
Berman, scientist, and his band of college students, 
Fred Viles, Nellie Adcock, Pauline Weston, Grace 
Thurston, Lyman Sinclair, and Ruth Doucett, who 
had successfully climbed Prospect Hill without a 
single accident. The expedition remained there 
all winter to gather scientific data. During this 
picture, the front row, filled with bald-headed 
spinsters hissed loudly. Prominent among them 
were Mabel Bntt, Anna Luke, Jeanne McNichoI, 
Dorothy Keefe, and Bertha Read. 

Then the house lights came on; a hush came 
over the audience as the ushers, Ralph Gustavson, 
Elwood Harper, and Antonio Zanco, all dressed 
in overalls, walked down the aisles and back. The 
members of the orchestra filed into the pit. 

"Well, bless my suspenders," said Pete, "if that 
isn't Eddie Booth on the conductor's stand!" 

We also recognized Donald Berry, Joseph Bon- 
ica, Arthur Lazazaro, Francis Boss, Armand Ferro, 
and Maurice Daniels, dressed in their musicians' 
costumes of silk shorts and black bow ties. 

As conductor Booth led the orchestra into the 
overture, the old maids in the boxes adjusted and 
cleaned their spectacles, smacked their lips, and 
got set for the chorus. The curtain went up, and 



THE MIEROE, 1936 

onto the stage came a dazzling array of beautifully With the departure of the paddy wagon, driven 

slim legs and twentieth century figures. by Philip Rhodes, the curtain came down and the 

"Well, bless my mother's false teeth," I ex- v/orld P«miete of Mrs. Pigs of the Garbage Patch 

claimed with wonder. There in the chorus turning was about to be S in - The front row of spinsters 

their personalities on the audience were Joseph went back to sleep. The familiar face of the bray- 

Lando, Frank Gaziano, John Logan, Samuel Col- m S donkey came on the screen first, above which 

lura, Robert Campbell, Oscar Nichols, Richard was wntten: " Ars Phooe y Artls -" This indicated 

Munroe, William Edmunds, and Roland Ostrand. the Wellman-Tamulewiez-Alha Company, succes- 

sors to the Metro-Silverwyn-Alderman Company. 

Then Paul Goldman, Robert Power, and Al „ rr . . , 

Gledhill came wriggling onto the stage and per- ' „„.„. .,_ 

. . 6& , tl f , , . „ , , Produced by William (Every Picture a 

formed the snakiest hoola-hoola we had ever _, „./_.-, , 

_, _, , . i i • i • Flop ) Hitchcock, 

seen. The way Goldman tossed his hips was no- _. c . , At , , ^ , 

. . , , . ' - r Directed by Alan McCarthy 

body s business. „., , . „„.„ , ^ . ^ . . , 

r limed by Willard Frye and Frederick 

At this point a riot started in the upper box Carley 

between Marjorie Noonan, Ann Pinkham, Martha Costumes by Virginia Fraser and Louise 

Bryden, Margaret Caruso, Miriam Holicker, and Gaines 

Donna Derbyshire. It ended with Donna in pos- Music arrange d by Harry Higgins and 

session of the opera glasses, Doris Bennet looking j ohn Healey (the modern Cab Callo- 

for her toupee, and Doris Seaburg hunting for her ways) 

wooden leg. THE CAsT 

The sound of Spanish castinets then filled the John Eaton .-. The Hero 

air as Lee Strickland and Mary Pottle did the Blanche Jones .'. The Heroine 

rhumba. Strickland's fiery prancing and the way Daniel Waickweiz The Father 

he rolled his eyes brought many a witty remark Don Green The City Slicker 

from the audience. Marjorie Furbush 

As these Ziegfeld beauties made their exit, the anc * 

stage was thrown into almost complete darkness Esther Hansen The Girls from the Farm 

and a large white bubble came floating on. Strain- Billie Childs • The Woman-Hater 

ing our eyes, we saw behind it a little maid who Mermaids 

flitted across the stage with remarkable grace and Esther Venini, Phyllis Uhlin, Betty Ross, 

neetness. Beside me Roy Bomengen was trying to Rachel Stimpson, and Alice Guiney. 

buy a flashlight from one of the ushers. As an The picture began with John and Blanche in 

encore, the little fairy did the Butterfly Dance. one of those fifteen minute clinches. Tenderly 

Amid the deafening applause, the lights were he whispered in her ear, "Garlic by any other 

thrown on, and there, making a bow, was Jean name would smell as strong." 

Harrington. -q, John," she replied, "I bet you tell that to 

Once more the chorus came on, but as they all the girls." 

started their dance a man jumped on the stage But time was precious to us, and we went out. 

and blew his whistle, which was covered with beer The sound of a shrill siren was heard, and a fire 

foam. It was Albert Regan, police inspector. He engine came tearing down Moody Street. The 

stopped the chorus on the ground that they were screeching of brakes was heard as it stopped be- 

wearing too many clothes. At his call, several fore Elsemore's CASH OR LEAVE IT DEPART - 

other policemen came in to take away the weeping MENT STORE. Firemen Mildred Grierson, Cy- 

beauties. They were Branden O'Neil, Francis rilla Mann, Elizabeth Elder, Victoria Eldridge, 

Powers, Herbert Pridham, John Keating, Edward and Maxine Lee got out, looked at the dresses in 

Kendall, Norman Stinehour, and Edwin Wasson. the store windows, and then proceeded to the fire. 



THE IIEEOE, 193G 



In the common on a soap box Socialist Harris 
Griff was throwing the bull. 

"I propose a bill," he said, "to pay all persons 
between the ages of ten and sixty $200 a month!" 

Franklin Ellis hollered, "Republican! Republi- 
can! Call the police!" 

Suddenly we saw a figure come tearing down the 
street, his shirt tails flapping in the wind. "Help! 
Help!" he yelled. It was Clyde Wilbur. After 
him, brandishing a rolling pin in her hand, came 
Doris Charnley. 

"I'll 'larn' that 'critter' to put mouse traps in 
his pockets!" 

Down the street we flew, all the while invisible. 
Before us stood the new eight-million dollar city 
hall, constructed by Caughey, Rigoli, and Carpen- 
ter, who built "anything from a fire to a sky- 
scraper." 

The city council was in session. Councilors 
Charlotte Carley, Lillian Prophet, Helen Polechio, 
Blanche Drozz, Catharine Mobilia, Elizabeth Matt- 
son, Margaret Mueller, and Elizabeth McKenna 
were present. Jewel Brown was presiding. "The 
meeting will now come to chaos," Jewel began. 

"I object!" interrupted Charlotte Anderson; 
but she was quickly silenced by Helena Barry. 

"I move we adjourn!" shouted Celia Blackstone. 
However, the motion was not carried. 

"Is there any business to be taken up?" Jewel 
continued. 

"Any business? Why there "h'aint bin' any 
business since Mayor Bamforth put up the new 
flag pole seven year ago!" scornfully remarked 
Lawrence Bennet, a spectator. 

"I move we have a bridge party next week," 
drawled Margaret McNamara, present Mayor of 
Waltham, during whose administration the city 
had gone into bankruptcy four times. 

"Shall it be formal or informal?" gleefully 
asked Margaret Mulrean, fashion expert. Of 
course, it was voted formal. Tea was then served 
by several pretty Dutch maids, Irene McCarty, 
Mary Murphy, Dorothy Brown, Mary Carastia, 
Frances Di Murro, Adele Sangerman, Jean Schau- 
fus, Barbara Beebe, and Bernard Coyle. After the 
tea, the girls all went window shopping. 



But time was precious to Pete and me, so on we 
went, anxious to see all we could before morning 
came. Off in the distance we saw the flashing of 
search lights, so we took to the air and glided 
toward them. On the way we came to the highest 
skyscraper in the world owned by the Great Nuts 
Corporation of America, whose board of directors 
included John Rhodes, Horton Reynold, Fred 
Brown, Salvatore Mirabito, Berton Morrison, 
Rudolph Nersesian, Joseph Lazaro, Edwin Love- 
quist, and Leslie Marshal. The stock of this cor- 
poration set a new low in value — each share was 
worth one-half a cent. 

We stopped for a moment in the radio studio, 
where the Shapiro Corset Company was broad- 
casting, on a coast to coast hook-up, its weekly 
thriller entitled "A Tight Squeeze." 

George McAlpine, the announcer, concluded the 
program with the charming reminder, "Remember 
Shapiro's Corsets — The Gay Deceivers!" 

"Baloney," scoffed Helen Cronin, "they're more 
like harsh restrainers!" 

Shapiro, the corset magnate, was still the shy, 
bashful boy of high school days. Success had not 
affected him. 

In another studio the world-famous artist, Dom- 
enic Lupo, was being interviewed. Domenic had 
made good ; he had painted the royalty of Europe 
and of Scollay Square. His painting of The Mod- 
ern II Penseroso (posed by Kenneth Trombley) 
had definitely established him. 

From another studio, the Riseberg Yeast Pro- 
gram was going on the air. 

"Eat Riseberg's Yeast," bellowed the announcer, 
Warren Luce. "It will either clear up that com- 
plexion or blow your insides out! Remember, 
Riseberg's complexion gives the yeast you love to 
touch !" 

Then the all-girl orchestra swung into Tear ll 
Down. The beautiful female musicians were Es- 
ther Lundquist, Norma Leaf, Ardelle Martin, 
Theresa Lynsky, Flora Periera, Mary Quinn, Eliza- 
beth Taranto, Leona La Valley, and Louise 
Holmes. 

It was conducted by that dynamic whirlwind, 
that bombshell of rhythm, Dolores Martin. At 



THE MIRROR, 1936 



the conclusion of this number, the all-girl chorus 
gave a heart-rending interpretation of "Daddy's on 
a Bat Again." The deep alto voices belonged to 
Marion MacLeod, Doris Lassman, Constance Ca- 
sella, Helen Walz, and Dorothy Thorne. The 
sopranos were Jean Peeling, Grace Thurston, Vivi- 
enne Katsogianis, Ruth King, and Mary Powers. 

In still another studio, we saw Avis Teele con- 
ducting her "Advice to The Love-Sick" program. 

But our curiosity was still aroused over those 
lights in the distance. Therefore, we left the 
studios and sped on toward the search lights. 
Nearer and nearer we came and finally made out 
the sign McMANUS' ATHLETIC CENTER. It 
included a race track, stadium, football field, base- 
ball diamond, and arena. We alighted on the 
race track, where there was a large crowd assem- 
bled. 

A huge electric sign was blinking out the news: 
PROFESSOR LLOYD TREFETHEN COMMIT- 
TED TO INSANE ASYLUM. THE PROFES- 
SOR KEEPS MURMURING: "PERPETUAL 
MOTION, PERPETUAL MOTION," AS HE 
TEARS HIS HAIR. 

"He always was a bit cracked," Pete remarked. 

Then Martha Wilson came strutting by. Mar- 
tha was the actress who had made May West seem 
as cold as a tombstone. It was reported that she 
had Donald Woodall, simple hick-town boy, in her 
clutch. Donald, born and brought up on a farm, 
was easy work for Martha. Following her was a 
long line of movie fans, including Elizabeth John- 
son, Ruth King, Shirley Kniznik, Robert Lane, 
Winifred Isaacson, Leonard Johnson, Maurice 
Jones, Richard Keith, and Phyllis Johnson. 

Seated in the reserved section was the much 
talked about brain trust of the Cutting Adminis- 
tration. The serious look on their faces showed 
the powerful minds that destiny had meted out to 
these men: Chadwick Maurer, Paul Cane, John 
Fink, Charles Falzone, Bradford Mosher William 
Edgar, Frank Enos, William Crawford, Domenic 
Ferrelli, Edward Le Blanc, William Littlefield, 
Theodore Malmgren, and George Mandigo. 

Above in the first balcony we saw the Curran 
Brothers, whose partnership had proved so profit- 
able. Frank was a physician; Leonard operated a 



fashionable funeral parlor. Seated near them were 
many of the season's Chelsea debutantes, foremost 
among whom were Florence McKeon, Marjorie 
Morris, Bernice Aseltine, Esther Bernstein, Natalie 
Bennet, Lillian Thurston, Emma Woodside, Evelyn 
Orleans, Thelma Geller, and Robert Goldman, 
who came out in May but went back in a month 
later. 

Now the horses were lined up and rearing to 
go. Jockeys, Sebastian Orifice, Paul Richard, Paul 
Delorey, Robert Wheeler, and Neil Perry were 
crouched over the horses' necks. In a second they 
were off. Mabel Fisher, gingerale heiress, was 
screaming hysterically as she embraced Hugh Mc- 
Lane, eminent physicist, who believed the world 
was oblong in shape and not round. He believed 
that by sailing south one would come to the South. 
Like Columbus, he was soon thrown in the 
"cooler". 

Round and round the horses flew 
And where they stopped, nobody knew 

(courtesy of Chase and Sanborn coffee) 
Faster and faster o'er hill and dale 
In mad pursuit of the Holy Grail. 

The disappointed crowd then flocked to the 
stadium to witness a football game between an 
all-girl team and an all-boy team. The Hot Stuff 
Eleven was comprised of Audrey Smart, quarter- 
back; Effie Schofield, halfback; Mary Evangelista, 
halfback; Dorothy Cogswell, fullback; Josephine 
Lore and Dorothy Frye, ends; Olive Boynton and 
Alice Campbell, guards; Edna Gladen and Helen 
Petrowsky, tackles; and Marion Davis, center. 
They wore blue velvet pants, green silk jerseys, 
and green socks to match. The Slippery Rock 
Eleven consisted of Peter Nearhos, Rosario Guil- 
iano, and Le Roy Powers in the backfield; and 
Albert Phillips, Walter Smith, Billy True, Albert 
Thorne, Richard Baltulis, and Donald Farnsworth 
in the line. 

The teams lined up in kick-off formation. Ref- 
eree Jeanne Carney blew her whistle, and the two 
teams came together with a crash. Farnsworth 
and Nearhos were carried off half concious. With 
what seemed to be their last breath they asked if 
their wives were on the field. Here a dispute 
arose. Audrey Smart complained that she had 



THE MIRROR, 1936 



been deliberately straight-armed and tripped, that 
her new jersey was dirtied. A sixty-yard penalty 
was given the Slippery Rock Eleven by Referee 
Carney. John Walsh and Rene Begin went in 
for Nearhos and Farnsworth, the girls powdered 
up, and the game went on. 

The large searchlights made it as bright as day- 
time. Suddenly the lights went out. When they 
came on again, the girls had made a touchdown; 
the boys were all laid out, groaning and complain- 
ing. Bricks were strewn all over the field ; where 
they came from was a mystery. Again the boys 
were penalized, this time for using naughty lan- 
guage. 

Several nurses, trained in the Angell Memorial 
Hospital, rushed out to help the boys. They were 
Virginia Battye, Mary Beninati, and Hazel Long. 
Frank Lituri, eminent veterinarian, was the attend- 
ant physician. In the confusion Angelina Straggas, 
hot dog heiress, fainted; but no one paid any at- 
tention, as there was a good old-fashioned fight 
going on between Paul Dinsmore, handsome play- 



boy of Waverley and Lincoln, and Allison Ring- 
rose, kindergarten teacher. 

Morning was coming. We started back to the 
cemetery, for woe to us if the sun touched us. 

"Extra! Extra!" shouted a newsboy (he was the 
six-year old neglected son of Yvonne Gibbs). 
"Forget all about it!" 

We bought a paper published by Herbert Hearst 
Lee, who boasted that his news was never more 
than a month behind times. The headlines were: 
PROFESSOR RICHARD EINSTEIN HENRY, 
BRILLIANT SCIENTIST, MAKES REMARK- 
ABLE DISCOVERY! He had found the seventh 
dimension one day while working in his labora- 
tory, but had carelessly misplaced it. 

As the sky grew brighter we hastened along, 
aware that the sun meant our doom. Faster and 
faster we went, for the sun was about to come up. 
Just as we reached the cemetery, the piercing, dis- 
integrating rays of the sun struck us. I saw Pete 
stumble forward and fade from sight. I felt my- 
self getting lighter, lighter . 

Woodrow Cataldo. 



Class 

LAB ORATE 

Every person, every organization has some creed 
which it tries to uphold; sometimes successfully, 
at other times not. Back in our Junior year mem- 
bers of the Class of '36 struggled and pondered 
over a motto suitable to be emblazoned on a wav- 
ing banner which would lead us forward when the 
ominous school doors were closed on us for the 
last time. We wanted one that we should be 
proud of, one of which we were worthy, and one 
worthy of us. This was no small task. We had 
to use careful consideration in choosing a few 
words by which we were going to be known and 
remembered from that day on. Thus the Class of 
1936 selected "Laborate et Vincite." "Work and 
Win," as a motto which we should at all times 
try to live up to. 



Motto 

ET VINCITE 

Each and every classmate has borne his share of 
the burden, and done his work, a little reluctantly 
perhaps at times, but nevertheless without com- 
plaining. Every one of us has at some time lent a 
helping hand to make a success of some project 
our classmates were undertaking. These projects 
have been many, and so have been the happy 
times enjoyed in return. We have worked not 
only for ourselves, but also for others. And from 
the results that have already been obtained, we 
may be assured that if we keep working and striv- 
ing for the best, when we come to the end of 
life's journey, we shall be able to say that we have 
won. 

Edward McCabe. 



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KAY'S I 



j GRADUATION SALE i 



l 

i OF WATCHES 

! ! 

? Special Discount to all ! 

j Waltham High Graduates \ 

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! KAY JEWELRY CO. 

I 316 MOODY STREET, WALTHAM 

| Harold E. Weston, Manager j 

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MIDDLESEX ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. 
A Complete Electrical Store 

689 MAIN STREET, WALTHAM 
Tel. Waltham 0437 



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Business j BlJRDETT 

College 



Training /or 
Young Men 
and Women 



156 STUART STREET 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Telephone Hancock 6300 






Business Administration 
Accounting 

Executive Secretarial 
Shorthand and 
Typewriting 

Business, and Finishing 
Courses 

One and Two-Year Programs. Previous commercial 
training not required for entrance. Leading col- 
leges represented in attendance. Students from 
different states. 




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58th year begins 
in September j 

Write or Telephone for 

Day or Evening I 

Catalog 

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Placement service 
free to graduates 
1478 employment calls 
received and 914 posi- 
tions filled in 1935. 



WE CALL AND DELIVER 



TEL. WALTHAM 0306M 



ABEL MELANSON 



TAILORING FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

LADIES SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
ALL KINDS OF REPAIRING. PRESSING. CLEANSING. AND 

DYEING 



11 CHURCH ST. 



Waltham, Mass. 



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MASSACHUSETTS MILK 



PASTEURIZED IN GLASS 



PHONE - WAL. 0227 



j 

j Compliments of 

i 

l HARRY A. STARR FUEL CO. 

! 

I " Serves You Right" 

I 

j Office: 

! 420 MOODY STREET WALTHAM, MASS. 

Telephone Waltham 0884 



CLASS DAY COMMITTEE 

Edward McCabe, Chairman 

Marjorie Beal Lloyd Trefethen 

Doris Charnley Roy Bomengen 

Marjorie Furbush 



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I BENNET R. O'NEIL 

) Prescription Optician 

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742 Main Street (Smart Building) j 



RUFUS WARREN & SONS 

Fine Footwear 
Repairing Promptly and Neatly Done 
31 Moody Street Waltham, Mass. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
MR. O'TOOLE 



j Waltham, Mass. Tel. Wal. 0654 

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| CHINA GLASS ' 

| DINNER WARE KITCHEN FURNISHINGS ' 

! 

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C. F. HUNT COMPANY , 

HORACE. E. WALLIS j 



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685 MAIN STREET 

WALTHAM, MASS. TEL. Wal. 2390 j 

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I Tel. Waltham 2680 

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I HERBERT T. SPENCER Inc. 

* Interior Furnishings 

j CUSTOM MADE SHADES 

• FINE CABINET WORK AND UPHOLSTERING 

| DRAPERIES, FLOOR COVERINGS 

\ AWNINGS. SCREENS 

I 

I 708 MAIN STREET WALTHAM, MASS. 

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J Ed. J. Provencher, Prop. 

"True To Its Name" "Reliable To The Minute" 



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The 

SHOE REBUILDING CO. 
705 MOODY ST. WALTHAM, MASS. 









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j CONGRATULATIONS & BEST WISHES 

! FOR A 

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HAPPY and SUCCESSFUL FUTURE 



(jlrabuatrng (Mass of 1936 

W. H. NICHOLS 






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\ J. J. MURRAY 

! Optometrist 

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l Mercantile Building 

j ROOMS 6 and 7 WALTHAM, MASS. 

j Telephone Waltham 1128-M 

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FOR HIGH SCHOOL 

MEN ALONE 

Kennedy's Under-Grad Shop is de- 
signed to serve and satisfy high 
school men who want and demand 
the correct new fashions attractive- 
ly priced. It is on the basis of su- 
perior value and style that we re- 
spectfully solicit your patronage 




Your High School pin i the 
size of the cut shown above 
in oxidized silver .... 50c 



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PAUL B. RILEY & CO. 
Insurance of All Kinds 

276 MAIN STREET WALTHAM, MASS. 

Telephone Waltham 2661 



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Autographs 



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BEDFORD INN 



Route 4 



BEDFORD, MASS. 



FRIED CLAMS 



SANDWICH SPECIALTIES 

ROAST DUCK 

TURKEY 



CHICKEN 



FOR PARTY RESERVATIONS CALL 

ROY L. HODGSON 

Lexington 1260 



INEXPENSIVE 

DELIGHTFUL 

SMART 

PARTY ACCOMMODATIONS 
with Booths 



"Let's go to the new" 
BEDFORD INN 

BEDFORD, MASS. 



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. . . Visit the School to learn more 
about our Business Administration, 



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| Secretarial, Special and other Courses ' 



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: Individual Advancement - Free Placement Service , 

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j BRYANT & STRATTON | 

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Commercial School , 

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COR. BOYLSTON AND ARLINGTON STS. j 

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j at the "Arlington" subway station j 

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Telephone KENmore 6789 

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Autographs 



Autographs 



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